• The New Hampshire Army Monument was unveiled on May 30, 2011 at the New Hampshire State Veterans Cemetery; the focal point of the monument is the “Battle Cross” – a bronze sculpture of combat boots, rifle and helmet. The helmet signifies the fallen Soldier; the inverted rife with bayonet signals a time for prayer, a break in the action to honor their comrade in arms; the combat boots represent the Soldier’s final march of the last battle. (U.S. Army photo by – Staff Sgt. Nicole Dykstra)

    110530-A-SR132-43

    The New Hampshire Army Monument was unveiled on May 30, 2011 at the New Hampshire State Veterans Cemetery; the focal point of the monument is the “Battle Cross” – a bronze sculpture of combat boots, rifle and helmet. The helmet signifies the...

  • The New Hampshire Army Monument was unveiled on May 30, 2011 at the New Hampshire State Veterans Cemetery; the focal point of the monument is the “Battle Cross” – a bronze sculpture of combat boots, rifle and helmet. The helmet signifies the fallen Soldier; the inverted rife with bayonet signals a time for prayer, a break in the action to honor their comrade in arms; the combat boots represent the Soldier’s final march of the last battle. (U.S. Army photo by – Staff Sgt. Nicole Dykstra)

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    The New Hampshire Army Monument was unveiled on May 30, 2011 at the New Hampshire State Veterans Cemetery; the focal point of the monument is the “Battle Cross” – a bronze sculpture of combat boots, rifle and helmet. The helmet signifies the...

Boscawen, N.H., May 30, 2011 - The deputy commanding general of the 99th Regional Support Command was on hand at the unveiling of the New Hampshire Army Monument to give his thoughts during a Memorial Day ceremony at the New Hampshire State Veterans Cemetery here.

Brig. Gen. Daniel Ammerman, representing the northeast region of the Army Reserve, expressed his honor and gratitude for being included in such an event, one with an additional meaning as a servicemember stationed at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst.

“I feel a special link to the town of Boscawen, for it was in this very place in 1798 that John Adams Dix was born,” he said. “This Civil War hero would be recognized in 1917, when the newly formed Camp Dix was named in his honor. His name lived on as Camp Dix became Fort Dix, and that history is still a part of the new joint base.”

The new Army Monument takes its place alongside monuments dedicated to the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps in the sprawling cemetery. The backdrop of the monument consists of a glass wall displaying images of more than 60 New Hampshire Soldiers from the Revolutionary War to present. The center inscription under the glass reads, “United States Army” " the left side inscription reads, “All Gave Some” and the right side inscription reads, “Some Gave All”. A large, black, granite bench faces the monument for visitors to pause at and reflect.

According to the 19 - member monument committee, the focal point of the monument is the “Battle Cross” " a bronze sculpture of combat boots, rifle and helmet. The helmet signifies the fallen Soldier; the inverted rife with bayonet signals a time for prayer, a break in the action to honor their comrade in arms; the combat boots represent the Soldier’s final march of the last battle.

“Every day as members of the armed services, we stand ready to fight our nation’s wars. Unfortunately, some of us never come home,” said Ammerman. “That’s why monuments such as this are invaluable; they help us remember those who have given their last measure, and support those who may be called upon to do so in the future.”

The 99th Regional Support Command acts as a “virtual installation” that provides world-class base operations support to over 50,000 Army Reserve Soldiers, 400 units and 300 facilities for the entire Northeast Region from Maine to Virginia for the Army Reserve in order to give our Warrior-Citizens and their Families the finest care, support, services and training.

Page last updated Wed June 15th, 2011 at 00:00