Corps-built F-22 facility recognized by concrete association
Quality assurance representative Steve Marsh (left) and project engineer Fred Nightengale display the award for best Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Military Airport Project for 2010, presented to the Utah resident office of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District by the Utah Chapter of the American Concrete Pavement Association Jan. 19. The award recognizes exceptional work in completing 11,600 square yards of concrete paving at the Corps-built F-22 Fuel Composite Overhaul Test facility at Hill Air Force Base in Utah.

SALT LAKE CITY - The Utah resident office of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District has been recognized as the best Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Military Airport Project for 2010.

The Utah Chapter of the American Concrete Pavement Association presented the award during the 10th Annual Concrete Pavement Workshop at the Little America Hotel in Salt Lake City Jan. 19.

The award recognizes the Corps-built F-22 Fuel Composite Overhaul Test facility at Hill Air Force Base in Utah; a $39.2 million, 78,000 square-foot facility for painting and maintenance of the F-22 aircraft, also known as the Raptor.

The project broke ground in summer 2008. A ceremony was held in September 2010 to commemorate its completion. The Utah resident office oversaw construction of the project from start to finish.

Sacramento District project engineer Fred Nightengale and quality assurance representative Steve Marsh accepted the award on behalf of the Utah resident office.

"It was a privilege to represent the Army Corps of Engineers, and specifically the Utah resident office staff that worked so hard to make this project a success," said Nightengale.

Contractor Green Construction Inc. installed 11,600 square yards of concrete paving for the project, providing access to the existing tow-way. Building aprons and additional tow-ways - basically massive sections of concrete around the building connecting it to the nearby runway, designed for use by the F-22 and other military vehicles - were also part of the project.

"This project was completed within all Corps of Engineers specifications, including smoothness, consolidation, and paste thickness, which resulted in a zero grind outcome," said Jason Redeen, project engineer with the Utah resident office. "This means the concrete was 'level' enough within tolerances from testing that we did not have to grind out any humps or high spots - meaning it was constructed pretty well.

"The overall job had 700 days and over 200,000 man-hours without a lost-time accident."

The project was completed within schedule and under budget.

Page last updated Fri July 22nd, 2011 at 12:16