• The Mount Zion Memorial Chapel Inspirational Dance Group performs at the 2011 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Observance, presented by the Third Infantry Division, Jan. 12, at Club Stewart.

    MLK pic

    The Mount Zion Memorial Chapel Inspirational Dance Group performs at the 2011 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Observance, presented by the Third Infantry Division, Jan. 12, at Club Stewart.

  • Savannah Mayor Otis Johnson speaks at the 2011 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Observance, presented by the Third Infantry Division, Jan. 12, at Club Stewart

    MLK pic 2

    Savannah Mayor Otis Johnson speaks at the 2011 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Observance, presented by the Third Infantry Division, Jan. 12, at Club Stewart

FORT STEWART, Ga. - For Sgt. 1st Class Bryan Harrison, an equal opportunity advisor with Third Infantry Division, one of Dr. Martin Luther King's many accomplishments is found among those he serves with.

"I think Martin Luther King's Legacy is seen today in today's military," he said. "If you look across the ranks, we are a very diverse fighting force. We all work together. I think this is one way his legacy plays out in today's society."

Sergeant First Class Harrison was one of many who honored his legacy at the 2011 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Observance, presented by the Third Infantry Division, Jan. 12, at Club Stewart.

The event was held to honor King's legacy of helping to attain equal rights for all in America.
Savannah Mayor Otis Johnson, a Navy veteran, spoke about how important King is to modern America.

Mayor Johnson spoke about how America today could learn from King's use of non-violent protests to attain equal justice for all Americans.

"We're celebrating a man of peace, a man of non-violence," he said. Johnson added that modern America could learn from him and the way he accomplished significant milestones of equal rights around the world through non-violent methods.

Mayor Johnson also spoke about how servicemembers do their part to preserve King's legacy.

"The military is our protector from outside threats," he said. "They fight so we can have peace. It's important for them to have some kind of context to see their service, to see why we ask them to sacrifice for us. That's why I never turn down an opportunity to come to Fort Stewart or Hunter army Airfield to say thank you for your service."

He also spoke about what he felt is another part of King's legacy: today's youth.

"They are the future," he said. "To see the young people today honoring Dr. King is very heartwarming and reassuring that we're going to be alright in the future."

Young people from the Hinesville area had portions of essays they wrote, entitled "Civil Rights and What It Means to Me."

The Mount Zion Memorial Chapel Inspirational Dance Group performed an inspirational dance as well.

Page last updated Fri July 22nd, 2011 at 12:16