• Dr. M. Haroon, with 3rd Commando Kandak based in Kandahar City, Afghanistan, mixes crushed antibiotic pills with a pediatric drink in order to hydrate 10-month-old Nawida and prevent a recurring infection Oct. 18.  Nawida underwent treatment to drain an infection from her leg.   Commandos and Soldiers from Special Operation Task Force - South, on a recent clearing operation in Kandahar Province, talked with Nawida's father and found she had an infection in her leg that was possibly life-threatening.  The partnered medical team cut open the infection and cleaned, drained and re-bandaged the wound.  Nawida was able to stand on her leg the following day.  (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Jeremy D. Crisp / Special Operations Task Force South).

    Afghan baby healed through coalition partnership

    Dr. M. Haroon, with 3rd Commando Kandak based in Kandahar City, Afghanistan, mixes crushed antibiotic pills with a pediatric drink in order to hydrate 10-month-old Nawida and prevent a recurring infection Oct. 18. Nawida underwent treatment to drain...

  • Nawida, a 10-month-old from Kandahar Province, cries out as an infection is cleaned from her leg Oct. 18 in Kandahar City, Afghanistan.  Commandos from 3rd Kandak and Soldiers from Special Operation Task Force - South, on a recent clearing operation in Kandahar Province, talked with Nawida's father and found she had an infection in her leg that was possibly life-threatening.  The partnered medical team cut open the infection and cleaned, drained and re-bandaged the wound.  Nawida was able to stand on her leg the following day. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Jeremy D. Crisp / Special Operations Task Force South).

    Afghan baby healed through coalition partnership

    Nawida, a 10-month-old from Kandahar Province, cries out as an infection is cleaned from her leg Oct. 18 in Kandahar City, Afghanistan. Commandos from 3rd Kandak and Soldiers from Special Operation Task Force - South, on a recent clearing operation in...

  • Dr. M. Haroon, with 3rd Commando Kandak based in Kandahar City, Afghanistan, holds the hand of 10-month-old Nawida as she is examined by a Special Operations Task Force – South doctor Oct. 18.  Nawida had an infected leg that needed to be drained, so the Afghan and SOTF-South medical team worked together to ensure her leg was properly treated.  (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Jeremy D. Crisp / Special Operations Task Force South).

    Afghan baby healed through coalition partnership

    Dr. M. Haroon, with 3rd Commando Kandak based in Kandahar City, Afghanistan, holds the hand of 10-month-old Nawida as she is examined by a Special Operations Task Force – South doctor Oct. 18. Nawida had an infected leg that needed to be drained, so...

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan - Afghan Commandos and U.S Special Forces conducted a clearing operation recently in Kandahar province, and in doing so came across a situation which they normally don't encounter.

They came across the father of 10-month-old baby-girl, Nawida, during their mission: she was a a girl with an infection in her leg that needed to be treated.

The combined force felt the infection in the leg would kill her within the next few days if it wasn't taken care of immediately.

"She was coughing and crawling around dragging her wounded leg behind her," said a Special Operations Task Force - South communications sergeant, who talked with the father during the clearing operation.

A plan was made to see the father again in order to treat Nawida.

They met on Oct. 18 as Dr. M. Haroon, from the 3rd Afghan Commando Kandak, along with a doctor from SOTF-South, helped treat the child's ailment and clear it of infection.

The father came to the Commando Camp and met with both doctors. It was explained exactly what was going to happen to Nawida.

It was a "simple procedure" said the SOTF-South doctor.

But medical care is scarce in the rural area from which the father hails in Kandahar Province.

The infection had been in the leg for some time, but within an hour, Nawida's procedure was done.

Haroon said being able to help Nawida and work with the SOTF-South team was "a great experience."

"Even better because I know she is going to be okay now," he said.

Nawida's father clasped hands with both doctors before they left from the procedure.

Nawida was soon standing, and the swelling in her leg was down.

The next day she was smiling, moving her leg and playing with the stuffed camel she was given to keep her mind off the procedure.

And 24 hours later, with medicine and replacement bandages in hand, father and daughter were headed home.

Page last updated Fri July 22nd, 2011 at 12:16