• Matt Argust, an environmental protection specialist, places hazardous waste on a storage rack until it is shipped off the installation.

    On the Job at Tobyhanna

    Matt Argust, an environmental protection specialist, places hazardous waste on a storage rack until it is shipped off the installation.

  • Ed VanCamp, a painter helper, scans a can of paint into the Hazardous Material Management System.

    On the Job at Tobyhanna

    Ed VanCamp, a painter helper, scans a can of paint into the Hazardous Material Management System.

  • Jaroslav Sebek, an environmental engineer, monitors the removal and disposal of an old heating oil tank.

    On the Job at Tobyhanna

    Jaroslav Sebek, an environmental engineer, monitors the removal and disposal of an old heating oil tank.

  • Michael Parrent, an environmental engineer, inspects the vegetative roof covering 61,000 square feet of the Tactical End Item Repair Facility's.  This will bring the total green roof covering on Tobyhanna Army Depot to more than 110,000 square feet.

    On the Job at Tobyhanna

    Michael Parrent, an environmental engineer, inspects the vegetative roof covering 61,000 square feet of the Tactical End Item Repair Facility's. This will bring the total green roof covering on Tobyhanna Army Depot to more than 110,000 square...

  • Brian Decker, an environmental engineer, uses the installation's energy management and control system to monitor electrical systems.

    On the Job at Tobyhanna

    Brian Decker, an environmental engineer, uses the installation's energy management and control system to monitor electrical systems.

  • Jason Sabater, a recycling employee, loads scrap cardboard into a baler for recycling.

    On the Job at Tobyhanna

    Jason Sabater, a recycling employee, loads scrap cardboard into a baler for recycling.

  • Joe Mazza, an environmental protection specialist, examines asbestos-containing pipe insulation to ensure it's in good condition.

    On the Job at Tobyhanna

    Joe Mazza, an environmental protection specialist, examines asbestos-containing pipe insulation to ensure it's in good condition.

  • Tom Wildoner, an environmental protection specialist, tests a drinking water leak detection sensor.

    On the Job at Tobyhanna

    Tom Wildoner, an environmental protection specialist, tests a drinking water leak detection sensor.

TOBYHANNA ARMY DEPOT, PA. - Environmental experts are helping to keep Tobyhanna Army Depot one of the greenest industrial facilities in the Defense Department.

Tobyhanna has earned numerous awards for its environmental, natural resource conservation and hazardous material reduction program. Its green roof initiative has reduced heating and cooling costs while extending the life of the roofs on which vegetative roofs have been installed.

Employees in the Industrial Risk Management Directorate's Environmental Management Division assess the depot's impact to the environment and continuously seek process improvements to protect the environment. They manage all facets of environmental programs such as Clean Air, Clean Drinking Water, Pest Management, Solid Waste, Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know, Energy Conservation, and Hazardous Materials.

Staff members here also ensure Tobyhanna stays in compliance with federal, state, local, and Army regulations by performing inspections, writing procedures, and reviewing construction projects and equipment purchases.

Tobyhanna Army Depot is the largest full-service Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) maintenance and logistics support facility in the Department of Defense. Employees repair, overhaul and fabricate electronics systems and components, from tactical field radios to the ground terminals for the defense satellite communications network.

Tobyhanna's missions support all branches of the Armed Forces. The depot is the Army Center of Industrial and Technical Excellence (CITE) for Communications-Electronics, Avionics, and Missile Guidance and Control Systems and the Air Force Technology Repair Center (TRC) for ground communications and electronics.

About 5,700 personnel are employed at Tobyhanna, which is located in the Pocono Mountains of northeastern Pennsylvania.

Tobyhanna Army Depot is part of the U.S. Army CECOM Life Cycle Management Command. Headquartered at Fort Monmouth, N.J., the command's mission is to research, develop, acquire, field and sustain communications, command, control, computer, intelligence, electronic warfare and sensors capabilities for the Armed Forces.

Page last updated Mon August 23rd, 2010 at 16:06