Fort Jackson celebrates Army's 235th birthday
Pvt. Shontia Jones, 18, the youngest Soldier in the 165th Infantry Brigade, and retired Maj. Gen. George Goldsmith cut the cake during the Army birthday celebration Monday in front of Post Headquarters.

FORT JACKSON, SC -- Temperatures nearing triple digits could not wilt the celebratory spirit as members of the Fort Jackson community gathered Monday in front of Post Headquarters in recognition of the Army's 235th birthday.

The ceremony was kept short and modest as a reminder that a lot of work remains to be done, said Col. Bryan Rudacille, commander of the 165th Infantry Brigade.

"Everywhere on Fort Jackson, officers, NCOs, Soldiers and our civilian workforce are hard at work on the tasks that will make sure our nation remains free and serves as an instrument of good in a world of uncertainty," he said.

Rudacille invited attendees to reflect on the Army by remembering its history, acknowledge its present and looking to its future.

"You can be proud of the fact that when our nation is threatened, struggling for answers or needs an institution of uncommon abilities it calls upon the Army," Rudacille said. "From our first day of inception in 1775 until today, we have played, and will continue to play, a vital role in the course of American history."

He reminded the crowd that Fort Jackson Soldiers are playing an active part in today's wars.

"Fort Jackson continues to send our incredible Soldiers to these fights," he said. "Each major command on this installation has people who have volunteered to deploy forward. They represent us well as they work tirelessly to further advance the goals and objectives that our elected officials have set for us."

Rudacille said the primary reason for the Army's success are the men and women who wear the uniform.

"We have every reason as we stand here today on Fort Jackson to be proud of the fact that we're part of the Army on its 235th birthday," he said.

Fort Jackson's Command Sgt. Maj. Brian Stall pointed out that June 14 marks not only the Army's inception in 1775, but also the date on which the American flag was adopted two years later.

"Those are the colors that we rally on," Stall said.

Page last updated Thu June 17th, 2010 at 08:37