• Command Sgt Maj. Gerardus Wykoff, outgoing U.S. Army Intelligence Center of Excellence and Fort Huachuca command sergeant major; Maj. Gen. John Custer, commanding general, USAICoE and Fort Huachuca; and Command Sgt. Maj. Todd Holiday, incoming command sergeant major, who is also the Military Intelligence Corps' command sergeant major, retreat off Brown Parade Field, following the passing of the noncommissioned officers' sword during today's change of responsibility ceremony, here.

    Command Sgt Maj. Gerardus Wykoff, outgoing U.S...

    Command Sgt Maj. Gerardus Wykoff, outgoing U.S. Army Intelligence Center of Excellence and Fort Huachuca command sergeant major; Maj. Gen. John Custer, commanding general, USAICoE and Fort Huachuca; and Command Sgt. Maj. Todd Holiday, incoming command...

  • Members of the joint color guard display the colors during the change of responsibility ceremony, yesterday on Fort Huachuca's Brown Parade Field.

    Members of the joint color guard display the...

    Members of the joint color guard display the colors during the change of responsibility ceremony, yesterday on Fort Huachuca's Brown Parade Field.

  • Command Sgt. Maj. Todd Holiday, U.S. Army Intelligence Center of Excellence and Fort Huachuca, and the Military Intelligence Corps command sergeant major, accepts the noncommissioned officers' sword from Maj. Gen. John Custer, commanding general, USAICoE and Fort Huachuca during the change of responsibility ceremony, held today, on Brown Parade Field.

    Command Sgt. Maj. Todd Holiday, U.S. Army...

    Command Sgt. Maj. Todd Holiday, U.S. Army Intelligence Center of Excellence and Fort Huachuca, and the Military Intelligence Corps command sergeant major, accepts the noncommissioned officers' sword from Maj. Gen. John Custer, commanding general...

FORT HUACHUCA, Ariz.--Command Sgt. Maj. Todd Holiday accepted the U.S. Army Intelligence Center of Excellence\'s noncommissioned officers' sword from Maj. Gen. John Custer, commanding general, USAICoE and Fort Huachuca, during a change of responsibility ceremony, today, on Fort Huachuca's Brown Parade Field.

The passing of the noncommissioned officers' sword signifies the relinquishing of responsibility and authority from Command Sgt. Maj. Gerardus Wykoff, outgoing command sergeant major, to Command Sgt. Maj. Todd Holiday, incoming command sergeant major, who is also the Military Intelligence Corps' command sergeant major. The sword represents the "cutting edge" of professionalism and the living spirit of the organization and its mission.

During the ceremony Custer noted, "ceremonies like this ... are always bittersweet, and today's is no different."

He described the outgoing sergeant major as an outstanding leader, mentor and Soldier, and expressed his appreciation for the noncommissioned officer.

Custer also welcomed Holiday, describing him as a "proven warrior," noting he looks forward to working with the "combat tested and proven leader."

Holiday's previous assignment was command sergeant major of the 513th Military Intelligence Brigade, Fort Gordon, Ga. He comes to Fort Huachuca, accompanied by his wife, Kishina, and son, Todd II.

Holiday thanked Custer for his "trust and confidence in my abilities to lead and serve our corps as your senior enlisted advisor."

He then addressed the crowd and told them, "As service men and women, the support of our Families is critical to our success. This is my Family's fifth move in six years ... thank you for your love, patience and support."

Next, he turned his focus to the "Fort Huachuca team" by thanking them for a "warm reception and tremendous support you have shown during our move." Holiday ended his speech by saying, "I look forward to meeting each and every one of you and serving with you in the future."

Custer thanked the participating military units, the 36th Army Band and B Troop, 4th U.S. Cavalry (Memorial), and ended his speech by telling the crowd, "May God bless. Army Strong. Always out front. Hooah!"

The noncommissioned officers' sword was adopted by the war department in 1840. The completely functional weapon was not intended for display, but for hard and dedicated use. While no longer part of the Army's inventory, American sergeants wore it for over 70 years, during the Mexican-American, Civil, and Spanish-American wars.

Page last updated Fri July 22nd, 2011 at 12:16