• AGADIR, Morocco - As a U.S. Soldier with the Tennessee Army National Guard's 1175th Transportation Company looks on, a Soldier from the Royal Moroccan Army translates course material about the Heavy Equipment Transport System here, May 6, for Moroccan motor transportation drivers during AFRICAN LION ‘10.

    Tennessee Guard supports Africa Lion 10 exercise

    AGADIR, Morocco - As a U.S. Soldier with the Tennessee Army National Guard's 1175th Transportation Company looks on, a Soldier from the Royal Moroccan Army translates course material about the Heavy Equipment Transport System here, May 6, for Moroccan...

AGADIR, Morocco -U.S. Army Staff Sgt. William Rose, a heavy equipment operator with the Tennessee National Guard's 1175th Transportation Company, demystifies the gauges on a dashboard that seems to stretch on for miles. Rose, along with six other U.S. Soldiers, recently conducted a Heavy Equipment Transport System familiarization course for a class of 22 Royal Moroccan Army motor transportation drivers and mechanics during Exercise AFRICAN LION '10.

Currently, the Moroccan military has a slightly older version of the HETS, which can transport payloads up to 70 tons. However, with new vehicles on the way, the Moroccan military requested a brief course from U.S. forces.

"We already have a general knowledge of the vehicles, and are familiar with the technology," said RMA Lt. Mohammed El Moutaouakkil, transportation officer with the RMA 3rd Transportation Group. "However, this is a good opportunity for us to stay current in our knowledge."

The seven-day course provided a comprehensive look at vehicle maintenance, driving techniques and loading and operating procedures, according to Rose.

"We are reviewing all the functions of the trucks," Rose said. "From cab controls to winches, to the coupling and uncoupling of the trailers as well as basic maintenance, we're reviewing it."

The students and instructors spent about 40 percent of their time in the classroom, and 60 percent involved in practical application of the new material.

"So far, our main challenge has been the language barrier," Rose noted. "However, several of the Moroccan officers speak English, and we have a Moroccan-born U.S. Soldier translating to French for the students, so it's not too much of an issue."

The students praised the enthusiasm of the instructors.

"Interested teachers make for interested students," said one Moroccan soldier. "This experience is of great benefit to our forces."

The HETS, although primarily designed to carry M-1A1 tanks, is valuable because of its versatility, according to Rose.

"We've used them to transport Humvees, shipping containers, and bulldozers," Rose said. "If it'll fit on the [trailer] bed, we'll haul it."

AFRICAN LION '10 is a U.S. Africa Command-sponsored exercise that includes various types of military training to include a command post exercise, intelligence capacity building, a field training exercise with live-fire, peace operations training, aviation training, medical exchange training, as well as humanitarian civic assistance progress.

The exercise is an annually scheduled, joint, combined U.S.-Moroccan event. It brings together nearly 1,000 U.S. service members from 16 locations throughout Europe and North America with more than 1,000 members of the Moroccan military. It is the largest exercise within the U.S. Africa Command area of activity, and is designed to promote interoperability and mutual understanding of each nation's military tactics, techniques and procedures. The exercise is scheduled to end on or around June 9. All U.S. forces will return to their home bases in the United States and Europe at the conclusion of the exercise.

Page last updated Fri July 22nd, 2011 at 12:16