• The U.S. Army Soldier Show cast, all active-duty Soldiers, performs their last act of the evening at the MG Robert B. Solomon Center on Sunday for their annual traveling road show.

    2007 U.S. Army Soldier Show Rocks Fort Jackson

    The U.S. Army Soldier Show cast, all active-duty Soldiers, performs their last act of the evening at the MG Robert B. Solomon Center on Sunday for their annual traveling road show.

  • Sgt. Ericka Escalante, Spc. John Morris and Staff Sgt. Elizabeth Snyder perform a country style medley, one of many acts performed live, at the MG Robert B. Solomon Center Sunday.

    2007 U.S. Army Soldier Show Rocks Fort Jackson

    Sgt. Ericka Escalante, Spc. John Morris and Staff Sgt. Elizabeth Snyder perform a country style medley, one of many acts performed live, at the MG Robert B. Solomon Center Sunday.

  • Members of the U.S. Army Soldier Show, from, left Spc. Dave Lemon, Staff Sgt. Walter C. Washington III, Staff Sgt. Jason Hanna and Staff Sgt. Anthony Sadler sing and dance during the Sunday performance at the MG Robert B. Solomon Center

    2007 U.S. Army Soldier Show Rocks Fort Jackson

    Members of the U.S. Army Soldier Show, from, left Spc. Dave Lemon, Staff Sgt. Walter C. Washington III, Staff Sgt. Jason Hanna and Staff Sgt. Anthony Sadler sing and dance during the Sunday performance at the MG Robert B. Solomon Center

Fort Jackson hosted the 2007 United States Army Soldier Show Saturday and Sunday at the MG Robert B. Solomon Center. This year's production theme, America's Soldiers Serving Proud, reflects a Soldier's love of country, courage and commitment to family.

The 2007 U.S. Army Soldier Show is a high-energy 90-minute live musical review showcasing the talents of active duty Soldiers throughout the Army who are selected by audition. The Soldier Show production was created "for the Soldier, by the Soldier," the working motto of the Army Entertainment Division.

They are amateur artists who have a passion for music, dance and performing. They come from infantry, transportation, military police, medical, intelligence, aviation, signal and other tactical units. The show is assembled in six weeks, and then tours for six-and-a-half months. New cast members are selected each year. Aspiring Soldiers worldwide submit application packages that include videotapes, biographies, photographs and letters of recommendation from their commanders. Soldiers must have an outstanding record in their units as well as demonstrate musical abilities, movement, stage presence and versatility.

On the road, Soldiers work an average 14-hour day, seven days a week for six-and-a-half months. Totally self-contained, the cast and crew offload, load, set-up and dismantle 18 tons of equipment at each stop on the tour, including four miles of cable and 100 theatrical lights. During the tour, they will handle more than 1 million pounds of electrical, sound, stage and lighting gear. Some Soldiers have described it as their toughest duty outside of combat.

Performances demonstrate the reasons that American Soldiers serve as they do and how they display esprit de corps serving the Army. Many genres of music were represented, and individual performances reflected how Soldiers serve America proudly and unselfishly.

In 2007, the Army celebrates the 87th anniversary of the debut of the first Army Soldier Show in 1918 and the 23rd anniversary of the modern U.S. Army Soldier Show.

The Soldier Show is not funded with taxpayer dollars, but with non-appropriated funds generated from business programs of Morale, Welfare and Recreation and with generous corporate sponsorship.

The show's Soldiers will be traveling throughout the United States and Korea to more than 45 installations. The mission of the Soldier Show is to entertain other Soldiers and is dedicated to all the men and women in uniform.

Page last updated Fri July 22nd, 2011 at 12:16