CSF
The program focuses on optimizing five dimensions of strength: Physical, Emotional, Social, Spiritual and Family. This holistic approach to fitness will enhance the performance and build resilience of the force in this era of persistent conflict and high operational tempo. Resilience is the ability to grow and thrive in the face of challenges and bounce back from adversity.

FORT SHAFTER, Hawaii -- Commanders across the Army are acutely aware of the personal struggles and conflicts multiple combat deployments have caused Soldiers.

The nature of sustained combat has resulted in rising numbers of suicides, domestic violence and divorce among our Warriors, and the Army is taking aggressive steps to reduce the stress among the force.

Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) was an established Army directorate beginning Oct. 1, 2008. The mission of this program is to develop and institute a holistic fitness program for Soldiers, families, and Army civilians in order to enhance performance and build resilience.

The program focuses on optimizing five dimensions of strength: Physical, Emotional, Social, Spiritual and Family. This holistic approach to fitness will enhance the performance and build resilience of the Force in this era of persistent conflict and high operational tempo. Resilience is the ability to grow and thrive in the face of challenges and bounce back from adversity.

CSF hosts a Web site for Soldiers to learn about the program and access the Global Assessment Tool (called the "GAT") survey. This survey allows Soldiers to assess dimensions of emotional, spiritual, social, and family fitness. By taking 10-20 minutes to answer about 100 questions, Soldiers will receive a rapid estimate of individual fitness in these four dimensions.

U.S. Army, Pacific Commander Lt. Gen. Benjamin R. Mixon expressed his concern about getting the CSF information into the hands of Soldiers. He said, "Key is educating them on how to connect the link through AKO, take the survey and work through some of the modules. As we get more trainers through the course, battalions can start designing battalion programs."

"It is critical for Soldiers to know that the GAT will not be used as a selection tool for promotion, command, or schooling," Mixon said referring to the fear among some Soldiers that the survey results could be viewed by others.

Although the survey is designed to be a self-assessment, it will serve a larger purpose for determining what training is most effective ein the five focus areas. Officials will strip the surveys of personal information and combine scores to reach aggregate scores.

Being Army Strong is more than just being physically fit. It is mental and emotional strength. It is the confidence to lead. It is the courage to stand up for your beliefs. It is the compassion to help others. It is the desire for lifelong learning. It is the intelligence to make the right decision. It is making a difference for yourself, your family, your community and our nation.

Mixon added, "USARPAC leadership wants this program to enhance the lives of balanced, healthy, self-confident Army Soldiers, families and civilians whose resilience and total fitness enables them to thrive in an era of high operational tempo and persistent conflict."

Visit http://www.army.mil/csf/ to take the GAT survey and to learn more about what the Army has to offer in building confidence to lead, courage to stand up for one's believes and compassion to help others, while maximizing one's potential.

Page last updated Tue December 29th, 2009 at 18:55