<b>Domestic All-Hazards Response Team </b>

<b>What is it'</b>

The Domestic All-Hazards Response Team (DART) establishes scalable capability based force packages that when coordinated by Chief, National Guard Bureau, CNGB and with consent of the Adjutants General, mobilize and deploy to an affected area in order to meet identified capability gaps. The DART conducts contingency planning, coordinates with participating states on existing Emergency Management Assistance Compacts (EMACs) and Time-Phased Force and Deployment Data (TPFDD) and upon request from a supported state(s) mobilizes, deploys to an affected area and provides additional command and control in support of a Joint Force Headquarters. The DART provides Defense Support of Civil Authorities (DSCA) capabilities in response to a catastrophic event. The DART conducts Joint Reception, Staging, Onward-movement & Integration (JRSOI) of inbound OPCON forces and establishes base support installations (BSIs)/forward operating bases (FOBs) for sustaining operations.

The DART consists of a division headquarters with down trace units including three division headquarters (one East, one West, and one reinforcing). Each DART provides the 10 essential domestic capabilities (force packages). This includes C2 (JFHQs for Joint Integration with Air Assets), Logistics (property, finance and maintenance), aviation, military police, engineering, transportation, medical (each DART has a medical detachment), chemical (with access to one or more CSTs), maintenance capabilities and signal assets. Approximately 50,000 troops are available east of the Mississippi and 30,000 west of the Mississippi for activation into Title 32 status. The DART is divided along FEMA region boundaries and is well positioned for interagency response.

<b>What has the DART done' </b>

The DART construct was successfully employed during the 2009 Inauguration by JTF-29 and has also been exercised in Rehearsal of Concept (ROC) drills and various other table top and field exercises.

<b>What continued efforts does the DART have planned for the future' </b>

The DART construct is a "pull" rather than "push" concept, which provides a joint reinforcing response, contingent upon TAG request for any part or all DART elements, reporting to TAG(s) through JFHQ-state(s). The DART is an additive to existing support agreements including hurricane matrices and emergency management assistance compact (EMAC) agreements.

<b>Why is this important to the Army National Guard' </b>

The DART construct integrates essential capabilities and assets of the Army National Guard. In addition to the essential ten capabilities, the DART adds mobility, agility and measured response. The DART maximizes the modular structure of the 21st century Army and positions the nation well to respond to any manmade or natural disaster.

<b>Resource:</b>

<a href="http://www.arng.army.mil/Pages/Default.aspx" target="_blank">Army National Guard Web site</a>

Page last updated Sun October 18th, 2009 at 21:48