• Smoke camouflages a Soldier's movements during a dismounted combat patrol at a Fort McCoy, Wis., training site.

    Combat medic course concludes

    Smoke camouflages a Soldier's movements during a dismounted combat patrol at a Fort McCoy, Wis., training site.

  • Combat medics gather details for documentation from detainees during a pre-deployment training class at Fort McCoy, Wis. Pictured from left are Sgt. Stacey Tyus, instructor, and medics Staff Sgt. Armind Guting, Spc. Marshe Harvey and Staff Sgt. Richard McDougle.

    Combat Medic Course concludes

    Combat medics gather details for documentation from detainees during a pre-deployment training class at Fort McCoy, Wis. Pictured from left are Sgt. Stacey Tyus, instructor, and medics Staff Sgt. Armind Guting, Spc. Marshe Harvey and Staff Sgt. Richard...

  • Combat medics treat simulated injured infantry Soldiers during a firefight in a village at a Mobile Urban Training Site at Fort McCoy, Wis. The medics had removed the injured Soldiers from the line of fire to stabilize them before evacuation. The training was part of pre-deployment medic training.

    Combat medic course

    Combat medics treat simulated injured infantry Soldiers during a firefight in a village at a Mobile Urban Training Site at Fort McCoy, Wis. The medics had removed the injured Soldiers from the line of fire to stabilize them before evacuation. The...

The 68W combat medic pre-deployment training course, which is concluding its one-year stay at Fort McCoy, Wis., is being declared a success by management and course instructors alike.

The course, which is mandatory for all deploying 68W National Guard and Army Reserve Soldiers, previously had been held at Camp Bullis, Texas, as well as 11 various locations throughout the United States.

Sgt. Maj. Bruce Timmins, noncommissioned officer-in-charge of the 181st Infantry Brigade's Medical Training Battalion, said "in the year the course was at McCoy, more than 2,800 Soldier medics received the required pre-deployment training."

"It has been very much a success at Fort McCoy," Timmins said. "We were able to train Soldier medics to be better prepared to accomplish their theater medical missions."

Timmins said the biggest impact this training has provided to the U.S. armed forces is that Soldier medic skills are enhanced to meet mission challenges.

This is important since many of these medics do not regularly practice medicine as part of their civilian jobs.

Medical Battalion Commander Col. Danny Tye said this training results in "expertly trained Soldier medics with the required skills to save lives on the battlefield."

Since this specific training began, the combat mortality rate decreased from the 20 to 30 percent in prior conflicts to less than 2 percent now.

In the past four years the Medical Training Battalion has trained in excess of 10,000 Soldier medics to stringent National Registry and Army Medical Center and School Standards.

Tye said the now-concluding pre-deployment training course is evolving into a slightly different Pre Deployment Trauma Training (PDTT) designed to have mobile training teams train brigade combat team medics at mobilization sites.

The new PDTT course is being established at the Army Medical School in San Antonio, and now is required Armywide.

"Our organization at Fort McCoy is being disestablished," Tye said. "The last training day was Oct. 2, and the last day personnel will be at Fort McCoy will be Dec. 1."

Page last updated Thu October 8th, 2009 at 14:47