PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. - Twenty Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center employees received 2009 Army Research and Development Achievement Awards. The RDA award is the Army's top award for research and development.

"These scientists and engineers distinguished themselves through their proven scientific and technical excellence or leadership," Thomas Killion, deputy assistant secretary of the Army for research and technology, stated in a July 24 letter announcing the winners.

"Their contributions promise to improve the Army's capability and enhance our national defense. The hard work and dedication of these individuals brings great credit to themselves, their organizations and the Army," he said of the winners.

"I'm proud of all of our RDA winners and happy that they've been recognized by Army headquarters for the work they do to support the current and future needs of our war fighters," said ARDEC Director, Dr. Joseph A. Lannon. "My congratulations to all the winners for this great recognition."

Maj. Gen. Paul S. Izzo, commanding general of the Research Development and Engineering Command, presented awards to the ARDEC winners during a ceremony here Aug. 31.

Those ARDEC employees recognized include:

Richard Fong, Peter Rottinger and Henry Hsieh for the development of a high-performance, multi-purpose warhead.

Dr. Brian Edward Fuchs, Neha Mehta and Amy Wilson for their work in the development of EDF-11. EDF-11 is an inexpensive explosive fill that will enable smaller, lighter and more reliable munition systems to be delivered to service members.

Dr. Brian Edward Fuchs for leading the team that developed EDF-11.

Dr. Paul D. Willson for leading a team of scientists and engineers in the development of applications and further improvements for the HyperX, an advanced multi-core parallel processor.

Ketula Patel, Christopher Calabrese, Gregory Roehrich and George Papanagopoulos for their work on the Small Unit Fires and Soldier Decision Support Technology system. This system was created to fuse, process and manage the large amounts of target and weapon information available to the small unit, enhancing the warfighter's ability to make timely and accurate decisions.

Dr. Eric Kathe for his work in developing three unprecedented advances in armament technology.

James Rutkowski, Nguyen Tran, Savino Davanzo and Kristy Klein for successfully designing a new propellant and unique propelling charge configuration. This new system drastically reduced logistic burdens and safety hazards, lowered blast overpressure and provided more firepower with increased range and improved precision.

Phil Samuels, Roger Wong, Bill Kuhnle and Paul Vinh for their work developing IMX-104, which is an insensitive explosive formulation replacement for Composition B. Composition B is a widely used explosive.

Page last updated Mon September 14th, 2009 at 10:52