BAGHDAD -- Maj. Calvin Moore, of Ahoskie, N.C., smiles as he talks about his wife, Sharon, and three children, all of whom he misses during his second deployment to Iraq with the 30th Heavy Brigade Combat Team. Moore taught science for 18 years and became a high school principal just before deploying as the brigade's resource manager, overseeing contracts for the brigade.

BAGHDAD -After 18 years as a teacher and coach, Calvin Moore had advanced to become principal of Bertie High School in Windsor, N.C.

But before his first school year was done, the National Guard major, who is an infantry officer, left to serve in Iraq as brigade resource manager for the 30th Heavy Brigade Combat Team.

"There's that part of loyalty and duty to the nation, and I will do my part," said Moore, who explained that students -- and even teachers -- asked if he could get out of the deployment.

"Students said, 'we want you to stay, we don't want you to go,' but I said that when they get older, they will understand there are just some higher callings," he said, "and the thing about being in the service is, when you get your orders you move forward."

Much like his rise to major in the North Carolina Guard, Moore marched his way up from the teacher ranks to become principal.
He taught science, was the head varsity basketball coach, and was the varsity football team offensive coordinator before being selected to become principal.
Moore said he his county superintendent and assistant superintendent have been very supportive, and he has no regrets about this deployment. But, he looks forward to returning to his civilian job.
"It was one of my career goals to become a principal. I didn't think it was going to happen when it did," Moore said. "I knew I was going to deploy before I became the principal, but sometimes you just have to take those opportunities when they come about.

"It's one of those jobs that it's a true honor to have it," he said.

Moore said his 25 years in the National Guard helped him obtain his appointment as principal.

"They looked at my military career as something that was a strength in the civilian piece," Moore said of the administrators in his school system. "They looked at the National Guard as an organization that would train leaders and give a person another perspective, another part of discipline, organization, management skills, things of that nature."

Moore said the values he learned in the Army had indeed rubbed off in his civilian job.

"I was sent the school's yearbook for this year. Some of the comments from students at the beginning of the book were about Coach Moore bringing more discipline and structure to the school. They knew that was what I stood for." Moore said.

Likewise, Moore said his time in public schools helped prepare him for his responsibilities during this deployment.

In his role here as the 30th HBCT's resource manager, Moore monitors contracts to make sure they are done correctly.

"It's anything to do with finances and contracting," Moore said of his job details. "I have to do quality assurance and quality checks on contracts, whether it's OMA [Army] funded or the commander's emergency response program."

Lt. Col. Jamie Mosteller, the brigade's operations officer and Moore's immediate supervisor, said because of Moore's maturity, experience and knowledge, he was the right person for the job.

"He's been in the brigade a while; he's kind of grown up here," said Mosteller of Lincolnton, N.C. "He has some administrative duties in his civilian job, in dealing with people and budgets, and he seemed like a good fit."

Moore said remaining organized has been a very important part of both careers.

"At times it's been difficult balancing between Guard and civilian life; the military-op[erational] tempo, then the responsibilities as teacher or principal, knowing how to juggle and balance it." Moore said.

"You really have to plan it out, just like planning out making sure [your] family is taken care of," he said. "You have to take care of family and plan time in there for them."

Page last updated Wed July 15th, 2009 at 18:29