• In a transcontinental trek that is expected to take about 26 days to complete, members of the Military Vehicle Preservation Association stopped for a respite at the Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles Friday for lunch and to inspect their caravan. The group is recreating the original trek across the United States by the  Army's Motor Transport Corps in 1919. It took 62 days for that group to travel 3,251 miles, averaging a little more than 50 miles per day, to cross from Washington, D.C. to San Francisco, Calif. Ten of those days were spent crossing the state of Nebraska, as the travelers traversed the state on the Lincoln Highway, later renamed Hwy 30.

    In a transcontinental trek that is expected to...

    In a transcontinental trek that is expected to take about 26 days to complete, members of the Military Vehicle Preservation Association stopped for a respite at the Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles Friday for lunch and to inspect their caravan...

  • In a transcontinental trek that is expected to take about 26 days to complete, members of the Military Vehicle Preservation Association stopped for a respite at the Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles Friday for lunch and to inspect their caravan. The group is recreating the original trek across the United States by the  Army's Motor Transport Corps in 1919. It took 62 days for that group to travel 3,251 miles, averaging a little more than 50 miles per day, to cross from Washington, D.C. to San Francisco, Calif. Ten of those days were spent crossing the state of Nebraska, as the travelers traversed the state on the Lincoln Highway, later renamed Hwy 30.

    In a transcontinental trek that is expected to...

    In a transcontinental trek that is expected to take about 26 days to complete, members of the Military Vehicle Preservation Association stopped for a respite at the Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles Friday for lunch and to inspect their caravan...

  • In a transcontinental trek that is expected to take about 26 days to complete, members of the Military Vehicle Preservation Association stopped for a respite at the Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles Friday for lunch and to inspect their caravan. The group is recreating the original trek across the United States by the  Army's Motor Transport Corps in 1919. It took 62 days for that group to travel 3,251 miles, averaging a little more than 50 miles per day, to cross from Washington, D.C. to San Francisco, Calif. Ten of those days were spent crossing the state of Nebraska, as the travelers traversed the state on the Lincoln Highway, later renamed Hwy 30.

    In a transcontinental trek that is expected to...

    In a transcontinental trek that is expected to take about 26 days to complete, members of the Military Vehicle Preservation Association stopped for a respite at the Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles Friday for lunch and to inspect their caravan...

  • In a transcontinental trek that is expected to take about 26 days to complete, members of the Military Vehicle Preservation Association stopped for a respite at the Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles Friday for lunch and to inspect their caravan. The group is recreating the original trek across the United States by the  Army's Motor Transport Corps in 1919. It took 62 days for that group to travel 3,251 miles, averaging a little more than 50 miles per day, to cross from Washington, D.C. to San Francisco, Calif. Ten of those days were spent crossing the state of Nebraska, as the travelers traversed the state on the Lincoln Highway, later renamed Hwy 30.

    In a transcontinental trek that is expected to...

    In a transcontinental trek that is expected to take about 26 days to complete, members of the Military Vehicle Preservation Association stopped for a respite at the Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles Friday for lunch and to inspect their caravan...

  • In a transcontinental trek that is expected to take about 26 days to complete, members of the Military Vehicle Preservation Association stopped for a respite at the Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles Friday for lunch and to inspect their caravan. The group is recreating the original trek across the United States by the  Army's Motor Transport Corps in 1919. It took 62 days for that group to travel 3,251 miles, averaging a little more than 50 miles per day, to cross from Washington, D.C. to San Francisco, Calif. Ten of those days were spent crossing the state of Nebraska, as the travelers traversed the state on the Lincoln Highway, later renamed Hwy 30.

    In a transcontinental trek that is expected to...

    In a transcontinental trek that is expected to take about 26 days to complete, members of the Military Vehicle Preservation Association stopped for a respite at the Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles Friday for lunch and to inspect their caravan...

<i>The following was written by Sgt. 1st Class Mark F. Ounan, an Active/ Guard infantry Soldier currently assigned to the 324th Military Police Btn., Chambersburg, Pa. Ounan is also the only current Soldier and Military Vehicle Preservation Association member taking place in the 2009 MVPA Convoy. Here's an exert from the journal he's keeping as he travels cross-country.</i>

Between driving from Grand Island to Ogallala, Neb., we stopped for lunch at the Heartland Military Museum in Lexington, Neb. There we were treated to a feast - not only the hearty barbecue lunch, but also their displays of extensive collection of military vehicles and memorabilia. We were happy to spend a couple of hours at this particular rest stop!

We proceeded on to Ogallala, NE - but just before we pulled into town, we ran into another bad storm - high winds and rain that just blew through the car. Harry put on his windbreaker, pulled the collar up around his neck, and held on to his hat. For Harry, it was just another rainy day. It was only later when we arrived into town that we learned a twister had touched down at our original rally point just a few minutes before our arrival.

As soon as we arrived at the Ogallala American Legion, we were off again to parade through the town. Even though it was just minutes after the storm, it seemed like everyone from the town lined the streets, handing out flags and waving. Within just a few minutes of the start of our parade, another storm blew in - but that didn't deter some people; they stood out in the rain, drenched, until we'd passed by and they'd had their chance to wave to us.

Page last updated Wed July 1st, 2009 at 09:53