• Lt. Col. Ronald E. Pacheco Jr., 391st Combat Sustainment Support Battalion commander, and Command Sgt. Maj. David C. Emerick, 391st CSSB senior enlisted leader, case the 391st CSSB colors as they transfer authority to the 264th CSSB during a ceremony at Contingency Operating Base Speicher, Iraq, May 25. The 391st CSSB from Bamberg, Germany, shipped 27,165 pallets, 2,773 containers and 6,784 pieces of Class VII materials during their deployment in support Operation Iraqi Freedom.

    391st CSSB hands over reins

    Lt. Col. Ronald E. Pacheco Jr., 391st Combat Sustainment Support Battalion commander, and Command Sgt. Maj. David C. Emerick, 391st CSSB senior enlisted leader, case the 391st CSSB colors as they transfer authority to the 264th CSSB during a ceremony...

  • Members of the official party salute the colors during a transfer of authority ceremony held at Contingency Operating Base Speicher, Iraq, May 25.  During the ceremony, the 391st Combat Sustainment Support Battalion from Bamberg, Germany, transferred authority to the 264th CSSB, which is based out of Fort Bragg, N.C

    391st CSSB hands over reins

    Members of the official party salute the colors during a transfer of authority ceremony held at Contingency Operating Base Speicher, Iraq, May 25. During the ceremony, the 391st Combat Sustainment Support Battalion from Bamberg, Germany, transferred...

  • Members of the combined Color Guard, comprised of 391st Combat Sustainment Support Battalion and 264th CSSB Soldiers, prepare to retire the colors during a transfer of authority ceremony held at Contingency Operating Base Speicher, Iraq, May 25.

    391st CSSB hands over reins

    Members of the combined Color Guard, comprised of 391st Combat Sustainment Support Battalion and 264th CSSB Soldiers, prepare to retire the colors during a transfer of authority ceremony held at Contingency Operating Base Speicher, Iraq, May 25.

CONTINGENCY OPERATING BASE SPEICHER, Iraq - The 391st Combat Sustainment Support Battalion transferred authority to the 264th CSSB during a ceremony here, May 25.

The 391st CSSB, an active-duty unit from Bamberg, Germany, provided key logistical support to its subordinate units in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Lt. Col. Ronald E. Pacheco Jr., 391st CSSB commander, recognized his Soldiers' hard work and dedication to the mission while deployed to Iraq.

"Over the last 15 months, the Soldiers of the Headquarters and Headquarters Company have performed their duties with extreme professionalism and dedication," Pacheco said. "From the first moment when we took over the logistical mission from the 927th CSSB, my staff identified areas that required improvement and immediately emplaced procedures and directed changes that enhanced the capability of both military and contracted support."

"Thanks to the brigade staffs and command teams from the 3d Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) and our parent unit, the 16th Sustainment Brigade," Pacheco continued, "Our Soldier benefited greatly from the support we received and we appreciate everything that they did for us while we were here."

During its combat tour, the 391st CSSB transitioned 9 units, conducted over 12 non-lethal engagements at 15 locations, oversaw the construction of a $17 million Class III steel bolted tank fuel farm, and started construction on the Class I climate controlled facility. The 391st CSSB also shipped 27,165 pallets, 2,773 containers and 6,784 pieces of Class VII materials.

Home based at Fort Bragg, N.C., the 264th CSSB and Coalition forces will have a role in executing task set in the security agreement commitment for the next 12 months. Lt. Col. Shane DeBusk, 264th CSSB commander, thanked the 391st CSSB for their work in theater, and preparing his Soldiers for the work that lies ahead of them in the next year.

"I'd like to thank Lt. Col. Pacheco and his staff for the professional and thorough transition plan you put into place and executed with my staff," said DeBusk. "You have done your job well and can depart in good conscience knowing that these Soldiers will be cared for and we will continue to run the ball down the field."

"Our mission over the next 12 months will be monumental. To put it into perspective, it took logisticians of another era 5 years to withdraw forces and equipment out of Vietnam. We will do it in half of that time," Debusk continued. "Few now appreciate how hard this will be, but I believe historians will regard what joint logisticians are about to do as one of the most significant military logistics feat in history. To accomplish this task, we must be forward leaning, agile and innovative in our thinking, always keeping the end state in mind."

Page last updated Tue June 2nd, 2009 at 06:51