Colors uncasing
143d Expeditionary Sustainment Command color guard Soldiers Staff Sgt. Roya S. Taylor, Sgt. Clifton Smith, Spc. Johnathan R. Brown and Sgt. David Wilborn, observe as Command Sgt. Maj. Michael D. Schultz and Brig. Gen. Daniel I. Schultz uncase the 143d's colors during a ceremony outside its headquarters at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan March 5, 2009.

KANDAHAR AIR FIELD, Afghanistan--The 143d Expeditionary Sustainment Command unfurled its colors in a ceremony outside of the 143d headquarters here March 5, 2009.

The 143d, arriving the last week of February, is the first Army Reserve ESC to operate logistics for all U.S. forces in Afghanistan. In addition to managing the movement of personnel and supplies into and within Afghanistan, the 143d ESC will assume garrison support responsibilities for U.S. Forces in Afghanistan's Regional Command South.

The 143d ESC is the first Expeditionary Sustainment Command to be dispatched to Afghanistan to coordinate the movement and support of additional forces to battle militants opposed to peace there. Based on tradition, a command's colors are placed inside an olive drab canvas case to signify the command has ceased operations at that location.

The colors are then uncased at the new or deployed location, signifying that the command is operational at its new station. Originally, Colors identified the unit in battle, but today the U.S. uses colors ceremonially.

The Institute of Heraldry says the 143d's unit patch, the interlacing arrows insignia on the command's colors, shows the command's previous designation as a transportation unit.

"The interlacing represents a strong support and simulates roads our subordinate units often travel and viaducts. They suggest travel," said Command Sgt. Maj. Michael D. Schultz, 143d ESC command sergeant major. "The arrowheads denote leadership and a determined direction -- they reflect our unit."

Staff Sgt. Roya S. Taylor, Operations Battle noncommissioned officer of the 143d, served in the ceremony's color guard. "You feel proud," she said. "You're representing your unit and your people."

Page last updated Fri March 13th, 2009 at 12:25