FBI 'captures' potential recruits at employment search Jan. 31
FBI Special Agent Steve Farr talks to a group of people during an Atlanta-based FBI field office employment search held Jan. 31, 2009 in the Army Community Service center at Fort McPherson, Ga. The FBI has more than 300 jobs in the organization, from administration to field agents.

FORT MCPHERSON, Ga. -- Being wanted by the FBI usually isn't a good thing, unless you are one of the potentially qualified applicants the organization recruits.

The Atlanta-based FBI field office held an employment search Jan. 31, 2009 in the Army Community Service center at Fort McPherson, Ga.

"Like the military, this is a great opportunity to serve," said Special Agent Steve Farr.

Farr, a 22-year agent who has worked on a variety of cases including human trafficking, said the FBI is comprised of more than just gun-toting field agents.

"It takes a lot to run an organization. There are more than 300 jobs with the FBI," he said, from entry to top level.

Chevonne Cooper, a Federal Emergency Management Agency secretary, was one of the hopefuls looking to learn more about applying for an administrative position.

Cooper, who works as a contractor, said she was interested because she enjoys government benefits and retirement incentives and thought this was a good opportunity to get a permanent position job with the government.

Typical job openings within the FBI are parceled throughout the year, Farr said. Between 30 and 40 jobs are opened at a time, with listings generally lasting two to three weeks, so people should continually check back to see if a position they are interested in is open.

Applications are filled out online once applicants complete the registration process, Farr said. Applicants may then browse jobs and select interested fields and geographical areas to serve in. When a position opens matching their criteria, the system generates an e-mail message sent to the applicant.

"It is a competitive, difficult system, but fair," Farr said, adding that more experience and education are keys to standing out.

The FBI is seeking people with skills related to these fields:

-- Finance and accounting

-- Security

-- Intelligence analysis

-- Compliance and quality assurance

-- Training and education

-- Records management

-- Fingerprint examination

-- Information technology

-- Nursing and counseling

-- Physical surveillance

-- Administrative/clerical processes

-- Automotive mechanics and

-- Management/program analysis

As the FBI transitions from a more law-enforcement-based agency to an intelligence-gathering agency, intelligence analyzers are in high demand, Farr said.

Special agent positions are also open, although candidates must be between 23 and 36 years old, Farr said.

For more information or to apply for a job with the FBI, visit fbijobs.gov.

"We have good jobs and good people," Farr said. "This is definitely something to pursue."

Page last updated Thu February 5th, 2009 at 14:26