Mechanics Put Armor Between Troops, Enemies
Spc. Robert Maloney, heater and air conditioner repair mechanic, 289th Quartermaster Company, 13th Sustainment Command, grinds down the door frame of a Humvee at the Baghdad International Airport Vehicle Enhancement Site, Iraq, Jan. 1. Maloney is part of a team that is improving the safety features of Humvees for Soldiers who regularly patrol the streets of Baghdad.

VICTORY BASE COMPLEX, Iraq (Army News Service, Jan. 22, 2007) - For Soldiers traversing the streets of Baghdad, there is no such thing as too much protection. Whether it's safety in numbers, cover from enemy fire or even armor on their vehicles, Soldiers who routinely serve outside the wire have an insatiable appetite for life-saving commodities.

To feed Soldiers a hearty helping of armor for their Humvees, Army Material Command enlisted the expertise of Soldiers to help put armor between troops and enemy attacks.

The 98th Maintenance Company, 393rd Corps Support Battalion, 15th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command, Multi-National Corps - Iraq, lent 24 of its Soldiers to AMC to expedite the enhancement of Humvees regularly exposed to enemy threats in the Baghdad area.

"We know we are making a difference and have helped save Soldiers' lives," said Capt. Cedric Harris, shop offer at the Baghdad International Airport Vehicle Enhancement Site.

More than 460 vehicles have been re-outfitted in two months, according to Staff Sgt. Thompson, noncommissioned officer in charge for vehicle enhancement, 1st Maintenance Company, 541st Corps Support Sustainment Battalion, 15th Sustainment Bde.

The Soldiers, all with 10 months' experience repairing, fabricating and armoring vehicles, converted two to three vehicles each day. Through an assembly line of five stations, the Soldiers outfitted each Humvee with the latest safety features and communication systems to include door supports and additional door armor, as well as new electronic turrets and shields.

"We have a belief that the work we're doing will save lives," Harris said. "A couple of units came back to our site and praised us for the work we had done on their vehicles because they were hit by IEDs or ambushed. They told us, without a doubt, because of the work we did, it helped save their lives."

Page last updated Mon January 22nd, 2007 at 09:22