• Cpl. James Carroll, a police officer 
with the Hapeville Police Department, teaches students at the Fort McPherson Child Development Center Wednesday to keep their thinking cap on when they are around strangers.

    Hapeville police deputize students

    Cpl. James Carroll, a police officer with the Hapeville Police Department, teaches students at the Fort McPherson Child Development Center Wednesday to keep their thinking cap on when they are around strangers.

  • Pre-kindergarten students from the Fort McPherson Child Development Center line up to be deputized Wednesday by Cpl. James Carroll, a police officer with the Hapeville Police Department, during a safety class at the center.

    Hapeville police deputize students

    Pre-kindergarten students from the Fort McPherson Child Development Center line up to be deputized Wednesday by Cpl. James Carroll, a police officer with the Hapeville Police Department, during a safety class at the center.

FORT MCPHERSON, Ga. -- Students from the Pre-kindergarten (pre-k) class at the Fort McPherson Child Development Center (CDC) received their official, plastic deputy badges Wednesday during a safety class with Cpl. James Carroll, a police officer with the Hapeville Police Department.

The Hapeville department has a partnership agreement with Fort McPherson for mutual support, as needed. Carroll stopped by to be part of the ongoing community helpers curriculum taught at the CDC.

"We are getting the students ready for kindergarten and exposing them to career fields that help in their daily life," said Linda Scroggins, assistant pre-k teacher at the CDC. "We try to create that job in class and then find those same-type organizations around post to show them community helpers in action."

Carroll talked to the students about various safety issues and how to respond to strangers.

"Strangers are people you don't know," J'Nya Blevins explained to her classmates. Blevins, 4, daughter of Erika Blevins, program support assistant with U.S. Army Garrison's administrative office, led the class in Carroll's taught response of what to say when the wrong type of stranger approaches: "Stay away," "Help" and "No."

Carroll charged the students to keep on their thinking caps and remember to stay safe and protect others, especially as strangers and Halloween approach.

Page last updated Thu October 16th, 2008 at 16:08