Alcohol, violence form toxic relationship
Alcohol does not cause violence. Nevertheless, alcohol is often a factor in violent acts in the U.S. as well as within the USAG Ansbach community. Alcohol-related violence degrades Army readiness and resilience.

ANSBACH, Germany (April 16, 2014) -- Alcohol does not cause violence. Nevertheless, alcohol is often a factor in violent acts in the U.S. as well as within the USAG Ansbach community.

Often in cases of familial violence (spousal and child abuse), sexual assault, physical assault and suicides, the individuals involved have a high blood alcohol content. In many alcohol-related crimes, both the person committing the crime and the victim had been drinking. Alcohol influences the human brain, which explains the correlation between consumption of alcohol and violence.

Alcohol is a powerful substance which causes detectable impairment on brain function. This impairment may lead to defective thinking, lack of control, slow reaction time, increased aggression, feelings of depression and erratic behavior. When large amounts of alcohol are consumed, normally logical individuals are likely to ignore their own common sense and values. It also becomes more difficult to maintain self control, as an intoxicated person may misread emotions within themselves and others. A combination of these symptoms creates toxic thinking, leading to violent behaviors.

It is normal for everyone to encounter different forms of stress in their daily lives. How each individual chooses to deal with these stressors may determine the difference between a positive outcome and a negative consequence. To increase the likelihood of a healthy outcome to one's problem, it is vital to deal with the problem while sober and thinking clearly.

Conversing about a problem in a civil manner is often the bridge to swift resolution. In some instances professional help may necessary to assist with healthy problem solving. USAG Ansbach has many helping professionals equipped to defuse conflict and restore healthy living with those who seek help.

Victims of violence are not to blame. Individuals who have a problem with alcohol and violence within their family may come to believe that it is a normal part of family functioning. Violence in the family is not normal and should not be accepted.

Attempting to protect yourself or someone you know from the truth about their issues with alcohol and violence only reinforces the perpetuation of the behaviors. Admitting that there is a problem with alcohol and violence is the first step towards solving it.

If you or someone you know is affected by alcohol and violence, USAG Ansbach Army Substance Abuse Program can help. To learn more, call 0980-283-1710 or DSN 467-1710.

Page last updated Fri April 18th, 2014 at 03:08