• Sgt. Zzachary McDonell, an infantryman with 1st Battalion, 506th Infantry Regiment "Red Currahee," 4th Brigade Combat Team (BCT), 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), climbs a mountain trail with fellow Currahees on a joint patrol with Afghan National Army soldiers in Paktia province, Afghanistan, Oct. 21, 2013. High altitudes are one of the conditions for which MORE is designed, specifically with high carbohydrate content to combat acute mountain sickness.

    AIMING HIGH

    Sgt. Zzachary McDonell, an infantryman with 1st Battalion, 506th Infantry Regiment "Red Currahee," 4th Brigade Combat Team (BCT), 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), climbs a mountain trail with fellow Currahees on a joint patrol with Afghan...

  • Julie Smith, a CFD senior food technologist, shows off MORE, which she helped to develop over the past five years to meet the caloric needs of Soldiers operating in extremes of heat, cold and altitude.

    PRIDE OF PRODUCT

    Julie Smith, a CFD senior food technologist, shows off MORE, which she helped to develop over the past five years to meet the caloric needs of Soldiers operating in extremes of heat, cold and altitude.

  • There are two types of MORE, one designed for high altitude and cold weather, and another intended for hot weather operations. Packs contain popular items including caffeinated pudding, carbohydrate-enhanced beverages, First Strike bars, nut mixes and Zapplesauce, which is applesauce fortified with maltodextrin, an energy-dense carbohydrate.

    COUNTING CALORIES

    There are two types of MORE, one designed for high altitude and cold weather, and another intended for hot weather operations. Packs contain popular items including caffeinated pudding, carbohydrate-enhanced beverages, First Strike bars, nut mixes and...

  • Afghan Border Police (ABP) and Soldiers from ABP Zone 1, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division hike from their landing zone to Observation Point 12 along the Afghanistan-Pakistan border, Jan. 21, 2013. Development of the MORE " High Altitude/Cold Weather involved warfighters from the U.S. Army Mountain Warfare Training School at Camp Ethan Allen, Vt., and the Connecticut National Guard's 1st Battalion, 102nd Infantry Regiment Mountain Training Group.

    MOUNTAIN-TESTED

    Afghan Border Police (ABP) and Soldiers from ABP Zone 1, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division hike from their landing zone to Observation Point 12 along the Afghanistan-Pakistan border, Jan. 21, 2013. Development of the MORE " High...

Warfighters in extreme, demanding operational environments need additional sustenance to complete their missions successfully--they simply need MORE. In this case, MORE is the Modular Operational Ration Enhancement, developed by the Combat Feeding Directorate (CFD) at the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research Development and Engineering Center (NSRDEC) as a direct result of requests from warfighters deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan.

"We received feedback from the field that some warfighters were losing weight and they needed extra calories," said Julie Smith, a CFD senior food technologist. Smith, along with Jim Lecollier, chief of the Individual Rations Branch, Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) Troop Support, worked with their respective teams from 2008 through 2013 to develop the MORE family of ration supplements specifically to meet this need.

MORE provides additional nutrition to warfighters operating in high-stress environments when their caloric requirements exceed those provided by their daily operational rations. MOREs are designed to augment the Meal, Ready-to-Eat (MRE), First Strike Ration (FSR) and Meal, Cold Weather/Long Range Patrol, as well as the family of Unitized Group Rations.

The MRE satisfies the Army surgeon general's strict requirements for nutrition in operational rations. Each MRE provides approximately 1,300 calories. An FSR, which replaces three MREs, has an average of 2,900 calories per ration. The MORE has an average of 1,110 calories per package.

Army Regulation 40-25, "Nutrition Standards and Education," a joint regulation of the surgeons general of the Army, Navy and Air Force, establishes nutritional standards, termed "military dietary reference intakes," for military feeding. Among these are nutritional standards for operational rations and restricted rations.

When warfighters conduct dismounted operations in challenging terrain, carrying more than 100 pounds of equipment up and down the mountains of Afghanistan with elevations as high as 12,000 feet, they can burn significantly more calories than when operating at sea level.

The MOREs are designed to provide the additional calories and nutrients to supplement their MREs or FSRs and give them the nutrition they need.

MORE, HOT AND COLD
Currently, there are two types of MOREs targeted for the different extremes of operational environments--high altitude and cold weather, and hot weather. Each type has three different varieties, for a total of six different MORE packs.

CFD collaborated with the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine to understand the unique nutritional needs of warfighters in these operational environments, said Smith.

"We reviewed literature and conducted focus groups to identify food preferences of warfighters when conducting missions in high altitude and cold weather, and hot weather environments."

Three MREs a day provide warfighters with a minimum of 3,600 calories, satisfying their nutritional needs for most missions. "However, there are some instances during exceptionally heavy activity where warfighters will need between 4,500 and 6,000 calories per day," said Smith. MORE provides that additional nutritional "oomph," giving warfighters approximately 1,000 extra calories in a balance of carbohydrates, caffeine, electrolytes and vitamins for these operational environments.

The first MORE enhancement pack developed by CFD was the MORE -- High Altitude/Cold Weather. At the time, military service representatives tasked CFD to develop an enhancement pack to counter weight loss and fatigue, and to improve the cognitive and physical performance of warfighters operating in the mountainous terrain of Afghanistan. Increased energy requirements during high-altitude operations, coupled with symptoms of acute mountain sickness, made this a challenging requirement to meet.

Acute mountain sickness, with symptoms including anoxia, headache, nausea and vomiting, is caused by reduced air pressure and lower oxygen levels at high altitudes. The faster you climb to a high altitude, the more likely you are to get acute mountain sickness. "The MORE is designed to be high in carbohydrates to combat acute mountain sickness. Research has shown that consuming a diet high in carbohydrates can lower the symptoms," said Smith.

In hot weather environments, hydration is particularly important, which is why the MORE -- Hot Weather includes two carbohydrate-and-electrolyte beverages. These two drinks are similar to sports drinks, providing not only pure energy in the form of carbohydrate, but also electrolytes such as potassium and sodium that warfighters sweat out. The electrolyte beverages are energy gels that come in mixed berry, orange and lemon-lime flavors. The carbohydrate beverages come in mixed berry, fruit punch and lemon-lime flavors.

MORE RESEARCH, TEST AND DESIGN
During the course of research and development on MORE, CFD conducted several focus groups and field evaluations. NSRDEC's Operational Forces Integration Group and the Consumer Research Team collected feedback and input. Small focus groups involved warfighters from the 10th Mountain Division's Light Fighter School at Fort Drum, NY, units that had deployed to Afghanistan and Army medical personnel.

Additional component selection and survey participation on the design selection, acceptability, convenience and benefit involved warfighters from the U.S. Army Mountain Warfare Training School at Camp Ethan Allen, Vt., and the Connecticut National Guard?'s 1st Battalion, 102nd Infantry Regiment Mountain Training Group.

CFD received an urgent-need request from the U.S. Army Special Operations Command in 2009 for 10,000 units of MORE -- High Altitude/Cold Weather to support the increase in troops deployed to Afghanistan.

MORE -- Hot Weather prototypes were field-tested with the 75th Ranger Regiment at the Pre-Ranger Course at Fort Benning, Ga.. MORE prototypes were also provided to special operations forces during high-altitude training in Colorado; deployed units of Combined Joint Task Force 82 in Afghanistan; and to Engineer and National Guard Scout units at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, during Operation Enduring Freedom.

"We assessed results from individual ration field evaluations to identify ration components with the highest acceptability and consumption rates," said Smith. "Feedback from warfighters indicated they preferred ration components that were easy-to-consume, eat-on-the-go, snack-type foods, rather than meals that would require time to heat and prepare."

Each pack is calorically dense and weighs only three quarters of a pound. Packs are filled with popular items including caffeinated pudding, energy gels, carbohydrate-enhanced beverages, First Strike bars, nut mixes, crackers, caffeinated gum and Zapplesauce, which is applesauce fortified with maltodextrin, an energy-dense carbohydrate and a source of energy to help maintain physical performance.

"Zapplesauce and First Strike bars provide the warfighter with essential complex carbohydrate," said Smith. Each food item serves a specific purpose for the warfighter. As with other operational rations, the goal is for the warfighter to consume every item to meet appropriate caloric needs.

AWARD-WINNING WORK
For their work in developing MORE, Smith and Lecollier received the prestigious Col. Rohland A. Isker Award in 2013 for leading their respective teams in developing, transitioning, acquiring and fielding MORE. The award is an annual honor from the Research and Development Associates for Military Food and Packaging, better known as R&DA, to recognize civilian employees of the federal government or military personnel for outstanding contributions to national preparedness. Isker, a pioneer in Army food service research and development, founded R&DA in 1946.

"Our review board at R&DA felt the MORE project and the ultimate fielding of the ration supplement itself had the most beneficial impact on warfighters (Soldiers, Marines and special operators) of any recently introduced operational ration product," said John McNulty, executive director of R&DA.

"MORE met a very compelling need to introduce much-needed calories and other nutrients into the diets of these warfighters during particularly stressful situations on the battlefield during extreme weather conditions. It was a success story that worked and received very high accolades from the field," McNulty said.

MORE also provides warfighters with important enhancements to improve mental alertness and physical endurance and, like all CFD products, is "Warfighter Recommended, Warfighter Tested, and Warfighter Approved." MORE is currently available for procurement through DLA Troop Support at http://www.troopsupport.dla.mil/subs/.

For more information, contact Joseph Zanchi at joseph.a.zanchi.civ@mail.mil.

Page last updated Mon March 10th, 2014 at 00:00