Fitness centers shake it up with new classes
Women participate in a morning pilates class at the Fortenberry-Colton Physical Fitness Center Nov. 12. New classes are being offered to accommodate the needs of those looking to shake things up.

FORT RUCKER, Ala. (November 15, 2013) -- Workouts can become stale and routine, and many people often find it hard to stay on track, but the Fort Rucker fitness centers are shaking things up by offering new classes to keep people in shape.

These new classes are being offered at both Fortenberry-Colton Physical Fitness Center and the Fort Rucker Physical Fitness Center, to put a twist on standard fitness classes and cater to those that might not have been able to work out before, according to Lynn Avila, fitness program coordinator.

"We're trying to accommodate more (parents) with young children who don't want to put their children in child care or can't pay for child care," said Avila. "We want to provide a little more help in that area, so that they can work out with their children at the same time."

The new classes that will be available include, Power Yoga, Outdoor Fitness, Outdoor Cycling, OH Baby, Stroller Derby and H2O Strength & Conditioning.

Power Yoga still utilizes the technique of stretching, as in traditional yoga, but integrates a muscle-strength technique to add a bit of strength training, said the fitness coordinator, adding that it's a good workout for people who are looking for something different.

Another workout that is being offered that caters to those seeking a change is H2O Strength & Conditioning. This class is a mixture of cardio intervals with strength training done in the pool for a low-impact workout.

"It's a really amazing workout for people with joint pain or injuries," said Avila. "If you have joint problems or issues like that, this is something that you can try that is a little different from other traditional workouts."

The Oh Baby class came about specifically out of need and requests from patrons to cater to women either going through pregnancy or up to six months after giving birth.

"We weren't offering any pregnancy classes and we've had a lot of interest in them, so we're trying to accommodate those women, as well as help them get in shape (during and) after their pregnancy," said Avila. "This is a good class because as long as women can stay somewhat active and in shape during the pregnancy, it makes it easier after they have the baby.

"The classes are a lot of the same things that we do in regular cardio activity classes, just modified for women going through pregnancy," she continued. "It helps keep them conditioned while they're pregnant and it helps get them back to their former fitness level safely."

Exercising can also help female Soldiers that must stay in shape, so that transitioning back to work after the pregnancy is made easier.

"They only have a certain amount of time after a pregnancy to get back to their normal (physical training routine), so this is just a way for some of them to stay in good shape, and do so safely," said the fitness coordinator.

Starting in January, several outdoor fitness options will be offered to accommodate those that want to do some of their workouts closer to nature.

Outdoor Fitness is a class for outdoor enthusiasts that will be held by the park at Beaver Lake that will encompass interval and strength training. It's also a good place for people to bring their children, so that they can spend time at the park while their parents are getting a workout, said Avila.

Outdoor Cycling will also be available for those who don't mind a little wind in their hair during their workouts. People can bring their own bikes or borrow one from the gym and meet with other riders for different workouts that focus on endurance with long rides, or strength with sprints and hills.

The Stroller Derby class is one class that actually incorporates the children into the workout by bringing them along for the ride.

Parents will meet on the PT track and do interval walks and runs, and perform other exercises utilizing weights and bands.

Avila said that although a lot of these exercises are meant to integrate the child into the parents' workouts, people shouldn't forget to take care of themselves in the process.

"People have to remember that it's not just about the baby, there is a (parent) there too," she said.

To sign up for classes, people can visit either fitness center, and classes are $3.50 per class, $15 for two weeks of unlimited classes or $30 a month for unlimited classes.

For more information, call 255-3794.

Page last updated Fri November 15th, 2013 at 10:08