• Jason Scarborough, right, conducts an initial consult on an incoming patient to the Muzgola Village Clinic during a mission trip to Malawi, Africa, in September.

    Scarborough1

    Jason Scarborough, right, conducts an initial consult on an incoming patient to the Muzgola Village Clinic during a mission trip to Malawi, Africa, in September.

  • Jason Scarborough, center, spends time with orphaned children whose parents died of HIV/AIDS. Each year, children are misplaced and live on their own because of this disease.

    Scarborough2

    Jason Scarborough, center, spends time with orphaned children whose parents died of HIV/AIDS. Each year, children are misplaced and live on their own because of this disease.

  • Patients await treatment outside the Muzgola medical clinic.  More than 2,300 patients were treated during the 10-day mission trip.

    Scarborough3

    Patients await treatment outside the Muzgola medical clinic. More than 2,300 patients were treated during the 10-day mission trip.

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala. -- Serving others extends beyond the daily mission for one U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command Department of the Army civilian and former Soldier.

Jason Scarborough, a management analyst with SMDC's G-3 Training, Readiness and Exercise Division, left Sept. 20 on a 10-day medical mission trip to Muzgola Village in Malawi, Africa. MedReach, a non-profit organization that assists churches in mobilizing medical mission teams, coordinated with Shiloh Baptist Church in Somerville, Alabama, to organize the trip.

Scarborough, a former Army medic and Wounded Warrior, was accompanied by a team of five doctors, two nurses, two pharmacists, and eight preacher-interpreters to treat more than 2,300 patients during their stay in Muzgola Village. The medical professionals treated various diseases and illnesses, including cases of malaria, gastrointestinal issues and malnutrition. The team also provided physical therapy, nutritional counseling, and instruction on wound care and treatment.

Every evening after the clinic closed, Scarborough and his team members traveled to nearby villages for ministry education and spiritual support. The ministry trips also doubled as a means of spreading the word about the Muzgola medical clinic. Within a few days, the clinic was receiving patients from more than 30 miles away.

"This trip was amazing and it warmed my heart to know that my gifts could be used through medicine again," Scarborough said. "It was fulfilling and humbling at the same time."

Malawi, Africa, is among the world's least-developed countries. The Malawian government depends heavily on outside aid to meet development needs; however, the aid offered for this need has decreased since 2000. The Malawian government faces challenges in building and expanding the economy; improving education, health care, and environmental protection; and becoming financially independent.

Page last updated Thu October 17th, 2013 at 00:00