'Holiday Greetings' team coming to Humphreys
Air Force Master Sgt. John Cronin, while with the Joint Hometown News Service at Fort George G. Meade, Md., counts down for someone getting ready to record a hometown Holiday Greeting. A team will be at Camp Humphreys from Sept. 5-7.

CAMP HUMPHREYS -- The Joint Hometown News Service Holiday Greetings team will be here Sept. 5-7 recording those who would like to send a holiday message to loved ones in the United States. This year, the team will be set up outside one of the entrances to the Main Exchange. In the event of inclement weather, they will be set up in the Community Activity Center. (Keep following the U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys Facebook page for possible changes.)

The team will record holiday greetings from 11 a.m.-7 p.m. (Sept. 5-6) and 10 a.m.-6 p.m. (Sept. 7), but it is customary for them to stay until the last person has recorded their greeting. Servicemembers, civilian employees from all branches of service, and their family members are eligible to participate. When the team sets up, there are just a few guidelines to follow to ensure family and friends back home see your personal greeting on local television and hear it on local radio stations:

• Servicemembers must be in uniform. Work uniform is fine. Family members should accompany their sponsor, unless the sponsor is deployed. And, of course, don't forget the props: Santa's hats, pets, banners and Christmas attire.

• Make sure to bring your address book. You'll need family members' names, city, state and phone number. No street address is needed, but station managers need phone contact info to let families know when the greeting will air.

In front of the camera, there aren't a lot of rules, but here are some tips to make the experience go smoothly -- relax, relax and relax. So what if you'll be seen by a million TV viewers. When you're taping it's just you and the camera. Other tips are:

• Try to be cheerful and in the holiday spirit. It doesn't show well on camera if your teenage daughter looks like she'd rather be at the mall than wishing grandma happy holidays.

• Try to keep hand gestures to a minimum and, of course, no profanity. When you're giving your greetings, don't say "Happy Thanksgiving." Most of these greetings will air from Thanksgiving Day through New Year's Day and could quickly become obsolete if the specific holiday mentioned has come and gone when your greeting airs.

• You don't need a teleprompter or a script, but try writing down your main points on a 3 x 5 card. Sometimes nerves can cause a bout of forgetfulness, so jot down your family members' names and the points you want to get across. If you have family in more than one area, you can do several greetings. You've got 15 to 20 seconds per greeting, more than enough time to get in your holiday wishes to those closest to you.

In 2009, this program produced close to 9,500 TV and radio greetings which were sent to 1,234 TV stations and 1,689 radio stations. Based on feedback received from the stations, more than 52 million households watched the greetings on TV and another 21 million heard them on the radio.
For more information about this program, call 754-6132.

Page last updated Fri August 23rd, 2013 at 00:00