• Participants of the Segok-dong office English Camp experience how emergent patients are treated in K-16 clinic during the camp's K-16 tour, July 25. (U.S. Army photo by Cpl. Jung Jihoon)

    Korean Kids tour K-16

    Participants of the Segok-dong office English Camp experience how emergent patients are treated in K-16 clinic during the camp's K-16 tour, July 25. (U.S. Army photo by Cpl. Jung Jihoon)

  • A participant of the Segok-dong office English Camp gets a chance to ride on a helicopter cockpit during the camp's K-16 tour, July 25. (U.S. Army photo by Cpl. Jung Ji-hoon)

    Korean Kids tour K-16

    A participant of the Segok-dong office English Camp gets a chance to ride on a helicopter cockpit during the camp's K-16 tour, July 25. (U.S. Army photo by Cpl. Jung Ji-hoon)

  • Participants of the Segok-dong office English Camp go through a lecture and demonstration session given by K-16 fire station employees during the camp's K-16 tour, July 25. (U.S. Army photo by Cpl. Jung Ji-hoon)

    Korean Kids tour K-16

    Participants of the Segok-dong office English Camp go through a lecture and demonstration session given by K-16 fire station employees during the camp's K-16 tour, July 25. (U.S. Army photo by Cpl. Jung Ji-hoon)

K-16 AIRFIELD, Republic of Korea -- Children from lower income and single parent Korean families visited K-16 U.S. Army airbase as part of an English Camp program sponsored by Segok-dong office, July 25.

During the visit, camp participants toured the landing strip, helicopters, fixed wing aircraft and visited facilities in the base including the commissary and clinic.

Segok-dong office has run the English camp since last year. The program contributes to bettering the Republic of Korea and United States of America alliance.

"I felt amiability from service members," said Guinam Park, a participant speaking about his first time visiting a U.S. Army base. "At first, it was a little nervous to be in middle of so many foreigners. However, now I can see why people call the ROK-US alliance a blood alliance."

In addition, hosting a visit from children especially helps KATUSA Soldiers to feel that they are playing a crucial role in ROK-US Alliance.

"It is my second time greeting the camp," said Cpl. Jisu Son, the senior KATUSA of K-16 Headquarters and Headquarters Company. "The kids are eager to learn and experience U.S Army base. Guiding them through it makes me feel proud of myself serving my nation at the first line of alliance between ROK and US."

The Segok-dong English camp, held each summer, is receiving good remarks from its participants and their parents.

"We made visiting K-16 one of our main curriculum to let children talk with service members freely in English," said Sunghye Hong, instructor of the camp. "Also, because our participants are mainly from lower income or single parent families, we wanted them to grow hope and dreams by experiencing many features in the base. The camp has been a success, and we definitely plan to make it ongoing."

Page last updated Thu August 8th, 2013 at 00:00