• Staff Sgt. Justin Gaume shows Pfc. Damian Legister how to "crush and squeeze" the clothing parts of role player Spc. Andrew Knopka during Sergeant's Time Training May 2 . The Sergeant's Time Training sessions demonstrated to Legister and his fellow Soldiers what do when they have to search and detain suspects.

    Search

    Staff Sgt. Justin Gaume shows Pfc. Damian Legister how to "crush and squeeze" the clothing parts of role player Spc. Andrew Knopka during Sergeant's Time Training May 2 . The Sergeant's Time Training sessions demonstrated to Legister and his fellow...

  • Pfc. Damian Legister cautiously takes a look at an engine block after asking a detainee role player (Spc. Andrew Konopka) to open the hood of a vehicle.

    Vehicle search

    Pfc. Damian Legister cautiously takes a look at an engine block after asking a detainee role player (Spc. Andrew Konopka) to open the hood of a vehicle.

  • Pfc. Zachariah Van Cleave hands over a pistol to a fellow Soldier after finding it hidden on a detainee role player.

    Frisk

    Pfc. Zachariah Van Cleave hands over a pistol to a fellow Soldier after finding it hidden on a detainee role player.

  • Pfc. Zachariah Van Cleave thoroughly frisks a detainee role player.

    Checking a suspect

    Pfc. Zachariah Van Cleave thoroughly frisks a detainee role player.

FORT LEE, Va. (May 9, 2013) -- You may have seen the images before: U.S. military personnel searching individuals and vehicles in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Although it may take on the look of a casual or even random act, there is an order and procedure. The Soldier's Manual of Common Tasks details them step-by-step. Recently members of the 54th Quartermaster Company, 530th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 82nd Sust. Brigade, received a block of training on the subject that included instruction and demonstration.

The 54th, a mortuary affairs unit, is not likely to encounter situations in which it will have to perform the procedures, but Staff Sgt. Justin Gaume, one of the trainers and a combat veteran, begs to differ.

"As an infantryman for nine years, I was amazed at some of the different MOSs who were coming out to work with us (during deployments)," he said.

Translation: in today's deployment environments, Soldiers and units don't have the luxury of not preparing for the least likely scenario. Preparation is key.

Page last updated Thu May 9th, 2013 at 00:00