• Wearing safety equipment, new Soldiers in Basic Combat Training in the 2nd Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, spar last week with pugil sticks. Pugil sticks are padded devices used since World War II by military personnel in training for rifle and bayonet combat.

    pugil1

    Wearing safety equipment, new Soldiers in Basic Combat Training in the 2nd Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, spar last week with pugil sticks. Pugil sticks are padded devices used since World War II by military personnel in training for rifle and...

  • New Soldiers undergo several hours of training before competing against each other in outdoor pugil stick combat.

    pugil2

    New Soldiers undergo several hours of training before competing against each other in outdoor pugil stick combat.

FORT JACKSON, S.C. -- Near the end of Basic Combat Training, new Soldiers will spend a few hours facing off against each other in pugilstick bouts.

Pugil sticks are padded training weapons used since World War II by military personnel in training for rifle and bayonet combat. In 2010, though, the Army overhauled Basic Combat Training to reflect changes in the modern battlefield.

Bayonet training was abandoned, and traditional combatives were reconfigured to focus on hand-to-hand fighting and handheld weapons.

The function of pugil-stick training is to mimic fighting with a rifle," said Staff Sgt. Jason Schuman, a drill sergeant with 1st Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment. "One of the pugil stick's ends is red to signify where a bayonet would be. The black end simulates the butt stock."

The training session allows Soldiers to practice fighting with a rifle in a safe, controlled environment, he said. It's also an opportunity to gain confidence in their newfound abilities Near the end of Basic Combat Training, new Soldiers will spend a few hours facing off against each other in pugilstick bouts.

Pugil sticks are padded training weapons used since World War II by military personnel in training for rifle and bayonet combat. In 2010, though, the Army overhauled Basic Combat Training to reflect changes in the modern battlefield. Bayonet training was abandoned, and traditional combatives were reconfigured to focus on hand-to-hand fighting and handheld weapons.

"The function of pugil-stick training is to mimic fighting with a rifle," said Staff Sgt. Jason Schuman, a drill sergeant with 1st Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment. "One of the pugil stick's ends is red to signify where a bayonet would be. The black end simulates the butt stock."

The training session allows Soldiers to practice fighting with a rifle in a safe, controlled environment, he said. It's also an opportunity to gain confidence in their newfound abilities.

"They're a little bit nervous and a little bit anxious because they don't know what to expect," Schuman said. "Overall, I think it's exciting for them. It's one of their favorite tasks here at BCT. "It might vary based on the unit, but this is a Week Six or Seven end-of-cycle task," he said. "We do a whole lot of combatives prior to it. It's a culminating event."

Pugil bouts are usually conducted with hard contact while wearing protective gear such as groin protectors, padded gloves and football helmets. New Soldiers are evaluated during pugil stick bouts,

Schuman said. "I look for control, for accuracy, and if they've applied what we've taught them," he said. "There's about one to two of instruction beforehand. As far as the bouts, you can go as long as you want."

"They're a little bit nervous and a little bit anxious because they don't know what to expect," Schuman said. "Overall, I think it's exciting for them. It's one of their favorite tasks here at BCT.

"It might vary based on the unit, but this is a Week Six or Seven end-of-cycle task," he said. "We do a whole lot of combatives prior to it. It's a culminating event."

"Pugil bouts are usually conducted with hard contact while wearing protective gear such as groin protectors, padded gloves and football helmets. New Soldiers are evaluated during pugil stick bouts, Schuman said. "I look for control, for accuracy, and if they've applied what we've taught them," he said. "There's about one to two of instruction beforehand. As far as the bouts, you can go as long as you want."

Page last updated Mon May 6th, 2013 at 00:00