• A call for Americans to serve their country has been a continuing theme for U.S. Army Recruiting Command and will likely continue as long as new recruits express that as a reason for joining the Army.

    IF NOT YOU

    A call for Americans to serve their country has been a continuing theme for U.S. Army Recruiting Command and will likely continue as long as new recruits express that as a reason for joining the Army.

  • Recruiters in Heath, Ohio, of the Columbus Recruiting Battalion ready to interact with high school students at a display in 1998, two years before the "Be All You Can Be" campaign was retired.

    Be All You Can Be

    Recruiters in Heath, Ohio, of the Columbus Recruiting Battalion ready to interact with high school students at a display in 1998, two years before the "Be All You Can Be" campaign was retired.

Uncle Sam wants you … again.
U.S. Army Recruiting Command will celebrate the 40th anniversary of the All-Volunteer Army July 1 and seeks the personal stories of those who served since 1973.
The command wants those millions of veterans to answer three questions: Why did you volunteer for the U.S. Army? What did you get out of your service? What do you think you contributed to the Army and nation through your service?
"Your stories of courage, service and sacrifice inspire new generations of Americans to follow in your footsteps," said Maj. Gen. David Mann, USAREC commanding general. "As Army ambassadors in your communities, our Soldiers for Life, we urge you to continue to share your Army Story wherever you go."
Veterans can answer these questions via email at armyrecruitingcommand@yahoo.com or through the Facebook page "Army All Volunteer 40th Anniversary." Include your name, rank, years of service, city and state where you currently reside, and, if possible, a picture of yourself in uniform.
U.S. Army Recruiting Command plans to use this information in Recruiter Journal magazine, the Facebook page (http://www.facebook.com/USAREC) and internet page (www.usarec.army.mil), throughout the Army via Army News Service, and in media releases.
Through 40 years of conflicts including the Cold War, small actions like Grenada and Panama, stability operations in Bosnia and Kosovo, to large-scale, intense battle in Afghanistan and Iraq, US Army volunteers demonstrated skill, leadership and effectiveness unmatched by any other nation's military.
"I personally believe one of the fundamental reasons our Army is respected and viewed as the preeminent combat land power is the highly qualified young men and women on our team," Mann said. "It's critically important to the health and future of our profession that those who are on our team, truly want to be on the team and are dedicated to serving something larger than themselves … the security of our nation."
Veterans Affairs estimates there are presently more than 9.7 million US citizens are Army veterans. It is not in the nature of a veteran, especially those who have seen combat, to talk about their service. U.S. Army Recruiting Command asks for veteran's stories for three reasons.
One, to establish an archive of Soldiers histories for the All-Volunteer Army on its 40th anniversary. Military history is a critical study for future generations of leaders and Recruiting Command. These stories will become an archive on the beginning of the All-Volunteer Army
Two, to make the American public aware of the success of the All-Volunteer Army. The last ten years of war have shaped many opinions, pro and con, about the US Army. Volunteer's stories will be a personal, eyewitness account of what the Army has meant to America during that time.
Three, to inspire the next generation of volunteers and their mentors. U.S. Army Recruiting Command tries to reach two primary audiences in the American public: prospective Soldiers and the adults who influence them. The stories of the first 40 years of the All Volunteer Army will help this effort.
A famous Army ballad from the early 20th century stated, "Old soldiers never die, they just fade away." With the help of Army veterans from the last 40 years, the success of the All-Volunteer Army will not fade away. Contact us at armyrecruitingcommand@yahoo.com or on Facebook at "Army All Volunteer 40th Anniversary" with your Army volunteer story.

Page last updated Mon April 15th, 2013 at 00:00