Addendum C (Sustain an All-Volunteer Force Composed of Highly Competent Soldiers that are Provided an Equally High Quality of Life)

print icon print version

Accomplishments

Since 9-11

circle Exceeded combined active and reserve retention goal each year.

circle Built over 26,500 barracks spaces and modernized over 12,200 existing spaces through our Barracks Modernization ProgramArmy Barracks Modernization Program
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

.

circle Dramatically improved family housing by privatizing 73,000 sets of quarters at 34 different installations through the Residential Communities Initiative.

circle Consistently improved careMedical and Dental Readiness
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

 for injured and severely wounded Soldiers upon their return from theater.

circle Established a comprehensive Well-Being framework to integrate, resource, and measure quality-of-life programs for Soldiers and families.

circle Provided rest and recuperationUSCENTCOM Rest and Recuperation Leave Program
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

 opportunities for more than 400,000 deployed Soldiers and Army Civilians.

2006

circle Exceeded retention objectives in all three components.

circle Achieved Active Component recruiting objective of 80,000 Soldiers - most Soldiers recruited since 1997.

circle Improved support to families by improving family support programs at installations.

circle Increased command support for Family Readiness GroupsFamily Readiness Groups and Special Initiative: The vFRG
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

 at all levels of organization.

circle Expanded Virtual Family Readiness Groups to improve support for families in remote locations.

circle Expanded community-based Child and Youth ServicesChild and Youth Services
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

 programs for child care, youth outreach, and school transition to support more than 200,000 Army children and youths.

circleExpanded the Residential Communities InitiativeResidential Communities Initiative
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

 to include construction of 392 apartments to house bachelors and unaccompanied Soldiers.

Our continuing success in accomplishing the Army mission is directly attributed to the talented men and women of our Army who provide "boots on the ground" around the world.  We are sustaining the All-Volunteer Force by:

Recruit and Retain the All-Volunteer Force

Sustaining the All-Volunteer force as an enduring institution is a fundamental strategic objective for the Army.  It serves as a vital investment in the future security of our Nation.  

We enjoyed great success in manning the Army during 2006.  More than 184,000 qualified men and women answered the Call to Duty by choosing to serve.  We exceeded our 80,000 total accession goal for the active component by 635 Soldiers – the most we have accessed since 1997.  Our Army National Guard met 98.6 percent of its total annual goal (69,042 of 70,000) – achieving its highest number of accessions since 1993.  Our Army Reserve finished the year at 95.4 percent of its total annual goal (34,379 of 36,032). 

The success we enjoyed during 2006 is significant in light of changing public attitudes toward the war and an improving economy and job market.  Less than one-third of our primary recruiting market (17 to 24 year old males) is fully qualified to serve in the Army (see Figure C-1).  We compete with the other Services for this relatively small pool of eligible candidates. Our challenge is perhaps the most difficult in the Armed Forces because we are the largest, most manpower-intensive Service.  We recruit more new enlistees each year than all of the other Services combined.  

With the support of the Congress and the Department of Defense, we accomplished our objective in 2006.  We attribute our success to improved advertising, an expanded recruiter base, and enlistment incentives program enhancementsArmy Enlistment Incentives Program Enhancements
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

.  New programs, such as the Army Referral BonusArmy Referral Bonus Pilot Program
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

 and the Recruiter Incentive Pay ProgramRecruiter Incentive Pay (RIP) Program
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

, along with several recruitment policy changesRecruitment Policy Changes
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

 and improved processes, also contributed to these successes.  We will require continued resources and support in the coming year to attract and access the best possible Soldiers to man our formations.

In October, we announced a new Army Recruitment Advertising Campaign: – Army StrongNew Army Recruiting Campaign: ARMY STRONG
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

.  This campaign highlights the physical, mental, and emotional strength of Soldiers.  It draws from past successes the Army has achieved and underscores the strength and pride our Soldiers demonstrate daily while serving the Nation, at home and abroad.  We are optimistic that this campaign, reinforced by the support of the Congress and the American people, will enable our 2006 recruiting successes to continue during 2007.

The Army continues to retainArmy Retention Program
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

 Soldiers at tremendously high levels.  While fighting the war on terror, we have surpassed our combined Army-wide retention goals, each year, since 2002.  In 2006, we exceeded our retention goals in the active component by five percent, in the Army National Guard by eighteen percent, and in the Army Reserve by three percent. 

Our Soldiers value the Army’s tradition of service to the Nation.  They appreciate the opportunity to contribute to national security in a meaningful way.  We continue to reenlist two out of every three eligible Soldiers who reach the end of their term of service.  We are particularly proud that one out of every two first-term Soldiers decides to reenlist.  We believe that our success in retention results from the high quality of leadership that our Soldiers experience in their units. 

The continued support of spousesArmy Spouse Employment Partnership
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

, parents, and veterans, along with the employersArmy Reserve: Army Reserve Employer Relations
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

 of our reserve component Soldiers, plays a huge role in recruiting and retaining our All-Volunteer force.  Their support directly affects the pride and morale of each of our Soldiers.  We have recognized over 800,000 of these key influencers through the Freedom Team Salute ProgramFreedom Team Salute
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

Primary Military Recruiting Market - Chart

Enlarge Image :: Figure C-1

Care for Soldiers, Civilians, and Army Families


Caring for Army families plays a vital role in sustaining the commitment of our Soldiers and Army Civilians.  Our leaders concentrate on this critical aspect of their duties.  We apply resources carefully to maintain and to improve the programs that are of the greatest concern to our family members.  We constantly work to assure our Soldiers, their families, and our civilian employees that they will be well taken care of and that their needs will be met. 

Army Well-Being programs provide leaders a variety of ways to care for our people.  We have integrated numerous Army-wide quality of life functions into a comprehensive Well-Being framework to better enable us to focus resources, measure success, and address the needs of an Army at war.  Our expanding Morale, Welfare, and Recreation ProgramsMorale Welfare and Recreation
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

 are a key part of this framework.  These programs help to reduce the stress of daily challenges and enhance mental and physical fitness for our Soldiers, their families, and our Army Civilians. 

Family Readiness GroupsFamily Readiness Groups and Special Initiative: the vFRG
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

, to include Virtual Family Readiness Groups, continue to be the centerpiece of our efforts to care for families before, during, and after Soldier deployments.   Our new Family Readiness Deployment Assistant ProgramFamily Readiness Group Deployment Assisstant Program
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

, which provides administrative and logistical support to Family Readiness Group leaders and Rear Detachment Commanders, has been a great success.   In 2006, The Army Chaplaincy's Strong Bonds ProgramStrong Bonds Program
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

 reached more than 40,000 active and reserve Soldiers.  This program is designed to help our Soldiers to maintain healthy family relationships. 

Compelling Needs

Support and full funding for critical recruiting and retention goals that enable the Army's effort to grow the Army by:

circle Achieving accession and retention goals across all components of the Army by providing incentives, recruiters, advertising, and other support.

circle Continuing support of Army initiatives to provide greater predictability and stability for Soldiers and their families in both our active and reserve components.

Support and full funding for quality-of-life programs that sustain the propensity to serve demonstrated by our Soldiers, their families, and our civilian employees and ensure a quality of life that matches the quality of their service to the Nation by:

circle Supporting housing initiatives to provide quality housing for Soldiers and families at installations impacted by current operations, Base Realignment and Closure, and the Global Defense Posture Realignment.

circle Supporting initiatives to improve medical care in both active and reserve components that attest to the Nation's concern for Soldier well-being.

circle Supporting construction of Child Development Centers, Youth CentersChild and youth Services
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

, Fitness Centers, Recreational Facilities, and Chapels.

Other programs and initiatives designed to reduce the stress of war for our Soldiers, families, and Army Civilians include:

Health care is another critical aspect of caring for our Soldiers and their families.  The Army provides world-class health care for over 3.5 million beneficiaries, on the battlefield, and at hospitals and clinics worldwide.  To fulfill our obligation to care for Soldiers and families, we continually look for ways to improve health and well-being.  The U.S. Army Wounded Warrior ProgramU.S. Army Wounded Warrior Program/Formerly Disabled Soldier Support System)
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

 exemplifies our commitment to honor the Soldier’s Creed by “never leaving a fallen comrade.”  This program provides continuous, comprehensive transition and support services for our severely wounded Soldiers.  These services continue, even if a Soldier is medically retired, to help our wounded warriors receive the support they have earned through their service to the Nation.   

Improve Soldier and Family Housing

Our commitment to providing quality housing for our Soldiers is reflected in the progress we are making progress in our Barracks Modernization ProgramArmy Barracks Modernization Program
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

 and in our Residential Communities InitiativeResidential Communities Initiative
- Click on the link to see more information on this topic -

.  We have been working aggressively, over many years, to improve the quality of the barracks which house our Soldiers. By the end of 2006, we had funded 85 percent of our goal for Army-wide modernization.  We expect to complete the funding of this vital initiative by the end of 2011.  In addition, we are planning for 36 percent of our barracks for new Soldiers entering the force to be modernized by 2013.  We are continuing to modernize the barracks used by our Army National Guard and Army Reserve Soldiers during their annual training. 

Through the Residential Communities Initiatives, we are providing better family housing for our Soldiers by employing an innovative privatization process.  This program leverages private investment capital to improve housing at much faster rates than traditional methods of financing and contracting for military construction.  When completed in 2010, over 98 percent of Army housing in the United States will have been privatized – over 86,000 units at 45 installations.  We have also constructed more than 7,600 family homes and renovated over 8,000 existing homes using traditional military construction. 

Improving housing is one of the most effective ways to provide our Soldiers and families with a quality of life that recognizes their service to the Nation.  Our programs in this area have a positive, enduring effect on morale, enable our Soldiers to provide for their families, and contribute immeasurably to our ability to sustain our All-Volunteer force.

The following initiatives (found in Addendum G) reinforce our efforts to Sustain an All-Volunteer Force:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Back to Top : Print Version

Executive Summary :: Security Environment :: Army Vision :: Mission :: Army Plan :: Balancing Risk :: Peace and Freedom :: Acronyms :: Addendum :: Home