Addendum B (Train and Equip Soldiers to Serve as Warriors and Grow Adaptive Leaders)

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Accomplishments

Since 9-11

circle Continued to adapt Combat Training CentersU.S. Army Combat Training Center Program
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 to replicate current cultural and language environments, emphasizing urban operations, live-fire convoy training, Improvised Explosive Devices, and working with joint and allied forces.

circle Continued to enhance Soldier protection by fielding flame-resistant uniforms and improving individual body armorInterceptor Body Armor
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. Today, every Soldier serving in Iraq and Afghanistan is issued improved body armor.

circle Continued to meet Combatant Commander's requirements for Tactical Vehicle ArmorAdd-on Armor for Tactical Wheeled Vehicles
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– delivering over 14,000 Up-Armored VehiclesUp-Armored Vehicle Program
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circle Equipped over 800,000 Soldiers with mission enhancing equipment through the Rapid Fielding InitiativeRapid Fielding Initiative
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.
.

2006

circle Distributed and prepositioned over 7,000 items of equipment to better posture the Army National Guard to respond to hurricanes and other missions.

circle Applied combat lessons to continued improvements in training on essential Warrior Tasks and Battle DrillsWarrior Tasks and Battle Drills
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 provided for all Soldiers, in all specialties, delivering initial military training.

circle Improved quantity and quality of language training.  Soldiers and Army Civilians can now study 30 languages available via the internet including Arabic, Chinese, and Tagalog.  To date, more than 66,000 personnel have completed over 85,000 units of instruction.

circle Reduced combat vehicle fatalities by 71 percent from the previous year by using a composite risk managementComposite Risk Management
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 process in all plans and operations.

circle Conducted over 1,700 different resident, non-resident, and distance learning training courses in Fiscal Year 2006 for Soldiers and civilians across all Army components, other services, and many partner nations.

circle Expanded our institutional training instruction – from training provided to Soldiers entering the Army to the education provided to our most senior officers – to increase development opportunity for Soldiers, military and civilian leaders, and students from partner nations.

circle Added cultural awareness to all professional military education courses, providing training for over 260,000 Soldiers and leaders.

circle Deployed a new Joint Precision Airdrop system to reduce numbers of cargo trucks on the road and limit Soldier exposure to enemy fire.

We are better preparing our Soldiers for the rigors of war and developing our leaders to serve as multi-skilled pentathletes able to thrive amidst complexity and uncertainty.  Recognizing that intellectual change precedes physical change,  we are:

Reinforce our Centerpiece: Soldiers as Warriors

Soldiers are the Army.  This idea is foremost in our thinking.  It is the Soldier—well trained, equipped, and led—who serves as the ultimate expression of the capabilities the Army provides to the Joint Force and the Nation.  For this reason, Soldiers are the centerpiece of our formations.  Their “boots on the ground” provide capabilities that no technology could ever replace.  

Our Soldiers operate in the human dimension—interacting with the populace, facing their enemies in close combat, while preserving the lives of innocent civilians around them.  We reinforce these warriors by preparing them with the mindset, training, and equipment they need to accomplish their mission in an increasingly uncertain, unpredictable security environment.

The Warrior EthosSoldier's Creed
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, a set of principles we live by, is imbued and reinforced through adherence to Army Values, and exemplary standards of conduct and discipline.  Our Warrior Ethos serves as the bedrock to prepare Soldiers and leaders to face danger and uncertainty, think critically, and solve the complex problems they face on today’s battlefield.  These values are reflected in three sets of guideposts for key groups within our Army:  the Soldier’s Creed, the Noncommissioned Officer’s Creed, and the Civilian Corps CreedCivilian Corps Creed
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.  To reinforce our commitment to values, we work aggressively, in our units and across the training base, to build pride in the Army’s traditions and our record of service to the Nation.

Our Soldiers believe in their mission.  They are making enormous sacrifices so that others may live in peace and freedom.  Their continued honorable, selfless service against ruthless, adaptive enemies is a testament to our values-based Army.  Our nation must remain equally committed to them by providing the capabilities and support they need to succeed in their mission.

Train Soldiers

To accomplish our mission, we are preparing our Soldiers from all components to conduct the full spectrum of operationsFull Spectrum Operations in Army Capstone Doctrine
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 as part of joint, interagency, and coalition teams.  This spectrum ranges from engaging with friends, allies, and partners to strengthen their capacity to conducting major combat operations. 

We are transforming how we train and educate our Soldiers to better prepare them to deal with the challenges they will face today and tomorrow.  We take a “lifelong approach” to enhancing knowledge and skills.  We begin upon entry into service and furnish opportunities for professional growth and learning throughout their careers. 

To better prepare Soldiers for combat, we have enhanced the rigor and relevance of training for newly enlisted Soldiers and recently commissioned officers.  Today, every Soldier and officer, regardless of specialty, becomes a warrior first.  A grouping of carefully selected Warrior Tasks and Battle DrillsWarrior Tasks and Battle Drills
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, developed from lessons learned on the battlefield, builds proficiency and confidence to function in today’s operational environment.  We conduct a biannual review of these tasks and drills to ensure continued relevance.

Through a program we call Operation Warrior Trainer, we are using the recent combat experiences of junior leaders from the Army National Guard and the Army Reserve to better prepare leaders for the challenges they will encounter.  This program relies upon officers and noncommissioned officers who volunteer to serve in our Training Support Brigades.  They teach, coach, and mentor their fellow Soldiers in the tactics, techniques, and procedures that were successful during their recent combat tours.

We are increasing our investment in our Soldiers to develop foreign language capability and to increase their appreciation, understanding, and respect for other cultures.  These two areas establish the foundation for improving our Soldiers’ abilities to operate in complex environments overseas and to work closely with other governments and militaries to strengthen the capacity of partner nations.  

Our operations in recent years have underscored the important role that language proficiency plays in the execution of successful operations.  It accelerates the process of building rapport with the local populace, partner nations, and other organizations.  In addition to language training in our schoolhouses, we also provide training on 30 languages to all Soldiers and Army Civilians through modern distance learning methods.  Language proficiency, coupled with focused instruction, is helping to improve cultural awareness and enhance leader development.  In addition, we are expanding opportunities for graduate level studies in all aspects of foreign cultures, which has the additional benefit of helping to retain our junior officers. 

In addition to these enhancements in training Soldiers and leaders, we are improving how we develop the readiness of our units.  Our Combined Arms Training StrategyUnit Combined Arms Training Strategies
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 is designed to provide trained and ready forces to meet the Combatant Commanders’ operational requirements.  This strategy features specific activities throughout what we refer to as multiple training domainsArmy Training Support System
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:  institutional, unit, and self-development. The cycles of Army Force Generation (ARFORGEN) – RESET and TRAIN ,READY, and AVAILABLE– allow commanders to optimize available training time in each of these domains, in a progressive manner, from individual training and education to more complex tasks in which whole units are involved.  We carefully manage the flow of equipment throughout the cycles of ARFORGEN to ensure units have the tools they need to conduct demanding, realistic unit training. Applying the latest technology to use simulated training experiences and other tools is helping us to remain ahead of our adversaries and to quickly adapt our doctrine and training methodsRed Team Education and Training
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 to prepare for a complex, dynamic environment. 

We are also expanding our distributed learning programThe Army Distributed Learning Program
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 to enhance opportunities to develop our Soldiers and Army Civilians.  On an average day over 22,000 Soldiers participate in one or more of the over 2,600 available online courses, including foreign language and cultural awareness training, to improve job proficiency and to work toward civilian degrees.  Army Knowledge OnlineArmy Knowledge Online/Defense Knowledge Online
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, the largest and most mature of all Department of Defense (DoD) portals, is the model for development of Defense Knowledge Online (DKO)Review of Education, Training, and Assignment for Leaders
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. DKO will be established as the DoD portal for personnel from all services, and will be the interface for providing DoD users with the services needed to accomplish their mission.

Enhance the Combat Training Centers

To better prepare our forces for the rigors of an increasingly uncertain, complex, and dangerous environment, we are continuing to enhance our Combat Training Center ProgramU.S. Army Combat Training Center Program
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.  We maintain three Combat Training Centers (CTC) which support large scale training operations.  A fourth center  supports the execution of the Battle Command Training ProgramBattle Command
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, which facilitates training through advanced simulation based exercises.  We are adapting the settings, conditions, and scenarios used at all of our centers based on operational experience.  To better prepare our Soldiers, leaders, and units, our goal is to accurately reproduce the complex environments—terrain, culture, language, and information—in which they will operate.  

At the CTCs, our Brigade Combat Teams and other units conduct pre-deployment training on their core mission skills.  As units practice their missions at the CTCs, they will encounter nongovernmental organizations, media, coalition forces, hundreds of civilians, interagency organizations and often, special operations forces.  This training is crucial to developing readiness for combat.  It enables our units to hone their skills and to develop into effective, cohesive teams before they deploy to our theaters of operation.

As we transform to a larger, more capable operational force, we require additional training capacity.  In addition, our training centers are exceeding their capacity because of sustained high levels of strategic demand for Army forces.   To meet the increasing need for world-class training to certify our units before they deploy, we are developing an exportable training capability.  This capability is providing an experience that is close to what is provided at our actual centers at units’ home stations.  This initiative provides greater flexibility to meet the schedules established by the Combatant Commanders.  It can also serve to reduce the time that our Soldiers are away from their home stations.

Our Battle Command Training Program provides realistic, stressful training, and leader development for corps, division, and brigade commanders and their staffs.  We use the latest simulation technology and developments in operational scenarios to create the challenging, dynamic conditions these headquarters will encounter when deployed.  This program prepares them to serve as joint and coalition task force operational headquarters in combat.

The rigor and relevance of our CTC Program is enhancing our capabilities across the full spectrum of operations.  By improving pre-deployment preparation, it is also reducing risk to our Soldiers.

Grow Adaptive LeadersArmy Leaders for the 21st Century
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Today’s security environment requires more of Army leaders at all levels.  The evolving Transition Team mission that our officers and noncommissioned officers are performing – to train foreign nation’s security forces – is but one example of the challenges our leaders are dealing with.  As we have seen in Iraq, Afghanistan, Korea, Europe, across the Americas, in peace enforcement operations around the world, and while providing civil support, the actions of individual Soldiers and leaders are vital to success and can have strategic consequences.

To better prepare our leaders to develop creative solutions to the complex, ambiguous problems they will face, we formed a special task force to Review Education, Training and Assignments for LeadersReview of Education, Training and Assignment for Leaders
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. We drew upon the ideas and experiences of the finest leaders inside and outside of the Army. 

The results of this task force’s work are now being incorporated into Army Leaders for the 21st Century (AL21)Army Leaders for the 21st Century
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– a comprehensive initiative designed to build leaders akin to pentathletes, skilled in many disciplines and able to rapidly transition between complex tasks with relative ease. 

We are evolving our training and education programs for our officers, noncommissioned officers, and civilians to grow military and civilian pentathletes.  We are teaching our leaders critical thinking skills – emphasizing how to think, not what to think.  Our focus is to develop highly adaptive leaders who have the intellectual agility needed to thrive in adverse, dynamic situations.  

For our newly commissioned officers we implemented the Basic Officer Leader Course (BOLC)Basic Officer Leader Course
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.  Consistent with our warrior first approach, this tough, standardized, small-unit leadership experience ensures that all junior officers, in all of our branches, master the skills they will need to lead in combat.  Our warrant officerWarrant Officer Education System
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 and noncommissioned officer programs are experiencing similar improvements in the rigor and relevance of training and education.

Guided by AL21, we are also overhauling our Civilian Education SystemCivilian Education System
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.  We are creating a progressive, sequential program to enhance leader development and provide structured education opportunities for our Army CiviliansArmy Career Intern/Fellows Program
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 throughout their careers.  Our goal, is to create Army Civilians who, as pentathletes, exemplify the Civilian Corps Creed in dealing with the full range of challenges they will face in providing our Soldiers with the resources, quality of life, infrastructure, and other support they will need to accomplish the Army’s mission.

Equip Our Soldiers

Providing our Soldiers with the best possible equipment is our highest priority.  The changed conditions of warfare necessitate that we can no longer accept risk in how we equip all of our Soldiers.  Since there are no front lines in today’s battlefields, we must now equip all of our units with night vision goggles, crew served weapons, communications equipment, and other critical items they need to survive.  We must also provide them with every means available to protect them and to minimize the risks to which they are exposed.   

One of the many programs we have designed to increase individual Soldier capabilities is the Rapid Fielding InitiativeRapid Fielding Initiative
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.  This initiative accelerates the fielding of commercial, off-the-shelf technologies to quickly deliver state-of-the-art equipment to our Soldiers to enhance their performance.  The Rapid Fielding Initiative  provides a specific set of equipment to every one of our deploying Soldiers.  We provide additional items of equipment to our Soldiers assigned to Brigade Combat Teams.  Since its inception, this initiative has equippedArmy Equipping and Reuse Conference
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 nearly 800,000 Soldiers. 

Recent experiences in operational theaters help us to determine the items we furnish to our Soldiers. Key examples of Rapid Fielding Initiative successes include:  the Advanced Combat Helmet, which enhances protection, comfort, and permits better hearing; and the Improved First Aid Kit, which improves the ability to treat bleeding from wounds and remove airway obstructions.  We plan to complete fielding these items to all operational forces by October 2007.

Compelling Needs

circle Full funding for Army operations and maintenance accounts to ensure readiness - of fully manned, trained, and equipped units - that are able to execute the full spectrum of operations.

circle Full funding of equipment modernization programs to accelerate the delivery of advanced technologies to our Soldiers to increase their combat effectiveness and protection.

circle Continued support to reset unit equipment needed to train Soldiers, to develop readiness to meet current, future challenges, and to defend the homeland.

circle Support to implement Army Leader for the 21st Century policies, programs, and initiatives designed to build pentathletes.

circle Full funding of infrastructure improvements – new construction and upgrade of existing training facilities and ranges –  to support our Combat Training Center Program and at our installations.

circle Full funding to expand our capacity to train Soldiers and grow adaptive leaders at our Combat Training Centers, at home stations, and across our institutional training base to accommodate the expansion of the Army.

circle Full funding to support the continued expansion of our language and cultural awareness programs in our schoolhouses and in our unit based activities.

Another key program, in which we restore battle losses and repair worn equipment, is our Reset ProgramReset
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. During “reset,” we restore Soldier and unit capability by repairing or replacing key items of their equipment, or issuing whole new types of equipment to them.  We also provide training on new equipment that our Soldiers are issued.

Like other aspects of support for an Army at war, our Soldiers’ effectiveness and protection depends upon a sustained national commitment to train and equip them properly.  Since 2003, we have issued over 900,000 sets of improved body armor.  We have delivered more than 14,000 up-armored HMMWVs to our theaters of operation.  In addition, we have deployed manned and unmanned systems to detect and to defeat Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs).  We have also fielded new systems such as the Armored Security Vehicle and the Buffalo Armored Reconnaissance Vehicle to better protect our convoy formations.

The IED is the deadliest terrorist method being used against our Soldiers.  We are investing unprecedented resources to counter this threat. The Army Asymmetric Warfare OfficeArmy Asymmetric Warfare Office
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 is our focal point to integrate a diverse range of asymmetric warfare intiatives. These initiatives include our efforts to counter the effectiveness of IEDs and to provide specific training for our units. This office also serves as our link to Defense Department initiatives in this area.

Our Rapid Equipping ForceRapid Equipping Force
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 is another means we are using to better protect our Soldiers.  This force works in partnership with industry, academic, and military leaders to quickly support unit equipping needs. It furnishes commanders with readily employable solutions to enhance lethality and survivability, using both off-the-shelf and new technologies. The Rapid Equipping Force is enabling us to remain ahead of adaptive enemies and save Soldiers’ lives.  Examples of Rapid Equipping Force successes include the deployment of language translators, vehicle scanning systems, and robots able to inspect possible IEDs.

The following initiatives (Addendum G) reinforce our efforts to Train and Equip Soldiers to Serve as Warriors and Grow Adaptive Leaders:

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