2005 Army Posture Statement Executive Summary

21st Century Security Environment: An Era of Uncertainty and Unpredictability

Transforming to Accomplish the Mission: Modularity, Rebalancing, and Stabilization

Balancing Risk: The Tension Between Current and Future Demands

Focusing Resources on Wartime Requirements: Major Decisions in 2004

Our Army at War - Relevant and Ready ... Today and Tomorrow


21st Century Security Environment: An Era of Uncertainty and Unpredictability

Operating within an uncertain, unpredictable environment, the Army must be prepared to sustain operations during a period of persistent conflict — a blurring of familiar distinctions between war and peace.

To improve our ability to provide forces and capabilities to the Combatant Commanders for the foreseeable future, the Army is undergoing its most profound restructuring in more than 50 years.

With the support of the Congress, the President, and the Department of Defense, we are making tremendous progress.

Transforming to Accomplish the Mission: Modularity, Rebalancing, and Stabilization

Army Transformation is focused to improve the capability of the Soldier, who remains the centerpiece of our formations. It has four primary goals.

This program, which we call modularity, will increase the combat power of the Active Component by 30 percent as well as the size of the Army's overall pool of available forces by 60 percent. The total number of available brigades will increase from 48 to 77 with 10 active brigades (three-and-a-third divisions in our old terms) being added by the end of 2006. Our goal for this larger pool of available forces is to enable the Army to generate forces in a rotational manner that will support two years at home following each deployed year for active forces, four years at home following each deployed year for the Army Reserve and five years at home following each deployed year for National Guard forces. Implementing this program will provide more time to train, predictable deployment schedules, and the continuous supply of landpower required by the Combatant Commanders and civil authorities.

The force, above the brigade level, will be supported by similarly modular supporting brigades that provide aviation, fires, logistics, and other support. Our headquarters structure will also become far more versatile and efficient as we eliminate an entire echelon of command - moving from three to two levels. Similar innovations will occur in the logistics and intelligence organizations that support our forces and other Services.

Our restructuring is already well underway. The 3rd Infantry Division, the vanguard of the invasion of Iraq, will return to Iraq as a restructured, modular force.

Balancing Risk: The Tension Between Current and Future Demands

The Army is grateful for the support of the Congress, the President, the Department of Defense, and the American people as we fight the Global War on Terror. Continued support — financial and moral - is vital. This year, like previous years since September 11, the Army's base budget supports force generation and sustainment operations and the supplemental budget request supports wartime efforts. The combination of these spending measures is needed to enable the Army to:

The scale and the pace of Army transformation is essential to improve the ability of American Soldiers to defeat adversaries who will pose complex, irregular challenges that are becoming increasingly more sophisticated and dangerous than those we now face.

Focusing Resources on Wartime Requirements: Major Decisions in 2004

Soldiers from 1st Battalion, 77th Armor Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, fight house-to-house during Operation Baton Rouge, in Samarra, Iraq.

The Army benefited from three major decisions in 2004, all providing resources to address immediate wartime needs. The Army also restructured or adjusted 126 programs. First, the Army cancelled the Comanche Program and reinvested the savings into other urgent aviation requirements. This decision enabled us to begin purchasing new airframes, fix many equipment shortfalls, enhance survivability, and begin modernizing our fleet. Second, we modified the schedule for fielding Future Combat Systems to put better capabilities into the hands of our fighting Soldiers. Third, Congress provided the authority to increase Active Component end strength by 30,000 Soldiers to support the war and the Army's conversion to modular formations.

Our Army at War - Relevant and Ready ... Today and Tomorrow

Our Nation remains at war. Soldiers understand their mission. They are well equipped and trained for the fight. They are well led by excellent leaders. Our transformation is already enhancing our capabilities today, while ensuring our preparedness for tomorrow. These efforts, however, will require full support of the base budget and supplemental.