ADDENDUM

Data required by the National Defense Authorization Act of 1994

Section 517 (b)(2)(A). The promotion rate for officers considered for promotion from within the promotion zone who are serving as active component advisors to units of the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve (in accordance with that program) compared with the promotion rate for other officers considered for promotion from within the promotion zone in the same pay grade and the same competitive category, shown for all officers of the Army.

AC in RC *
Army Average**
Fiscal Year 1999 (percent)
Major
70.4
77.8
Lieutenant Colonel
28.6
68.7

Fiscal Year 2000 (percent)

Major
65.0
79.5
Lieutenant Colonel
44.4
72.1

*Active component officers serving in reserve component assignments at time of consideration.
**Active component officers not serving in reserve component assignments at the time of consideration.

Section 517 (b)(2)(B). The promotion rate for officers considered for promotion from below the promotion zone who are serving as active component advisors to units of the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve (in accordance with that program) compared in the same manner (as the paragraph above).

AC in RC***
ARMY****
Fiscal Year 1999 (percent)
Major
1.1
3.8
Lieutenant Colonel
0
3.4

Fiscal Year 2000 (percent)

Major
2.3
4.8
Lieutenant Colonel
0
6.3

*** Below the zone active component officers serving in reserve component assignments at time of consideration.
***** Below the zone active component officers not serving in reserve component assignments at the time of consideration.

Section 521(b).

(1) The number and percentage of officers with at least two years of active-duty before becoming a member of the Army National Guard or the U.S. Army Reserve Selected Reserve units.

  • Army National Guard (ARNG) officers 22,029 or 58.9 percent.
  • U.S. Army Reserve (USAR) officers 14,736 or 44.1 percent.

(2) The number and percentage of enlisted personnel with at least two years of active-duty before becoming a member of the Army National Guard or the U.S. Army Reserve Selected Reserve units.

  • 155,858 ARNG enlisted or 49.4 percent.
  • 46,437 USAR enlisted or 29.8 percent.

(3) The numbers of officers who are graduates of one of the service academies and were released from active duty before the completion of their active-duty service obligation;
-- Of those officers

(A) The number who are serving the remaining period of their active-duty service obligation as a member of the Selected Reserve pursuant to section 1112(a)(1) of ANGCRRA:

  • In FY 00, 35 officers were released to the selective reserve to complete their obligation.

(B) The number for whom waivers were granted by the Secretary under section 1112(a)(2) of ANGCRRA, together with the reason for each waiver:

  • In FY 00, no waivers were granted by the Secretary of the Army.

(4) The number of officers who were commissioned as distinguished Reserve Officers' Training Corps graduates and were released from active duty before the completion of their active-duty service obligation:

  • In FY 00, 15 ROTC DMG graduates were released before completing their active duty service obligation.

Of those officers

(A) The number who are serving the remaining period of their active-duty service obligation as a member of the Selected Reserve pursuant to section 1112(a)(1) of ANGCRRA:

  • In FY 00, 15 were released from AD and assigned to ARNG to complete their obligation.

(B) The number for whom waivers were granted by the Secretary under section 1112(a)(2) of ANGCRRA, together with the reason for each waiver:

  • In FY 00, no waivers were granted by the Secretary of the Army.

(5) The number of officers who are graduates of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps program and who are performing their minimum period of obligated service in accordance with section 1112(b) of ANGCRRA by a combination of (A) two years of active duty, and (B) such additional period of service as is necessary to complete the remainder of such obligation served in the National Guard and, of those officers, the number for whom permission to perform their minimum period of obligated service in accordance with that section was granted during the preceding fiscal year; and the number of officers who are graduates of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps program and who are performing their minimum period of obligated service in accordance with section 1112(b) of ANGCRRA by a combination of (A) two years of active duty, and (B) such additional period of service as is necessary to complete the remainder of such additional period of service as is necessary to complete the remainder of such obligation served in the U.S. Army Reserve and, of those officer, the number for whom permission to perform their minimum period of obligated service in accordance with that section was granted during the preceding fiscal year.

  • In FY 00, a total of 43 ROTC graduates were released early from their active duty obligation. Of these, 15 were Distinguished Military Graduates and previously accounted for in question 4. The 28 remaining ROTC graduates are serving the remainder of their obligation in the National Guard.

(6) The number of officers for whom recommendations were made during the preceding fiscal year for a unit vacancy promotion to a grade above first lieutenant and, of those recommendations, the number and percentage that were concurred in by an active duty officer under section 1113(a) of ANGCRRA, shown separately for each of the three categories of officers set forth in section 1113(b) of ANGCRRA:

  • In Jan 00, 38 USAR officers from Force Support Package (FSP) units were recommended for unit vacancy promotion. 32 were favorably considered. 26 officers were recommended for the Jun 00 board. The results have not been published.
  • In the ARNG, in FY2000, the number of officers recommended for unit vacancy promotions, above the grade of first lieutenant, was 2257. An active duty officer concurred in 100% of those officer promotions.

(7) The number of waivers during the preceding fiscal year under section 1114(a) of ANGCRRA of any standard prescribed by the Secretary establishing a military education requirement for noncommissioned officers and the reason for each such waiver.

  • In FY 00, no waivers were granted by the Secretary of the Army.

(8) The number and distribution by grade, shown for each State, of personnel in the initial entry training and non-deployability personnel accounting category established under 1115 of ANGCRRA for members of the Army National Guard who have not completed the minimum training required for deployment or who are otherwise not available for deployment and a narrative summarizing procedures to be followed in FY00 to account for members of the USAR who have not completed the minimum training required for deployment or who are otherwise not available for deployment:

  • In FY 00, the number of ARNG non-deployable personnel was 37,645. The National Guard Bureau (NGB) maintains the detailed information.
  • The USAR makes a substantial investment in training, time, equipment, and related expenses when persons enter military service. Separation before completion of an obligated period of service is wasteful because it results in loss of this investment and generates a requirement for increased accessions. Consequently, attrition is an issue of significant concern at all levels of responsibility within the USAR. Reasonable efforts are made to identify soldiers who exhibit a likelihood for early separation, and to improve their chances for retention through counseling, retraining, and rehabilitation prior to initiation of separation proceedings.

Non Prior Service (NPS) enlistees in USAR units will normally be ordered to IADT within 270 days of enlistment. NPS direct enlistees in the IRR must enter IADT within 180 days after date of enlistment. NPS enlistees may be authorized an additional period of delay from reporting as provided in AR 601-25, paragraph 3-4.

An enlisted soldier who cannot satisfactorily complete the MOS training for which selected will be required to accept training to qualify for an alternate MOS as determined by the USAR unit commander (AR 612- 201). The tracking of new soldiers who have not completed training is done by the use of the Training Pay category codes. All soldiers who are awaiting shipment to Basic training are listed as Pay Category 'P'. Those soldiers who have completed Basic training, returned to their USAR unit, and are now waiting to attend Advanced Individual Training are coded as Pay Category 'Q'. Those soldiers attending training are carried in Pay Category 'F' while they are at school.

Those soldiers who are not "deployable" for reasons other than lack of IET are listed on the personnel databases with a code indicating the reasons for their non-deployable status.


(9) The number of members of the Army National Guard, shown for each State, that were discharged during the previous fiscal year pursuant to 1115(c)(1) of ANGCRRA for not completing the minimum training required for deployment within 24 months after entering the National Guard and a narrative summarizing procedures to be followed in FY01 for discharging members of the USAR who have not completed the minimum training required for deployment within 24 months of entering the USAR.

  • The number of ARNG soldiers discharged during the previous fiscal year pursuant to 11115(c)(1) of ARNGCRRA for not completing the minimum training required for deployment within 24 months after entering the National Guard is 3086, which includes all 54 states and territories. The breakdown by each state is maintained by National Guard Bureau.
  • Those soldiers who have not completed the required IET within the first 24 months are discharged from the USAR under AR 135-178 Separation of Enlisted Personnel. Before discharge, every means available is used to ensure the soldier has had the opportunity to be trained. In some cases, the soldier was unable to attend the required scheduled training through no fault of the soldier, (e.g. temporary medical condition, death of an immediate family member, failure to complete high school and requiring an additional semester of summer school).

(10) The number of waivers, shown for each State, that were granted by the Secretary during the previous fiscal year under section 1115(c)(2) of ANGCRRA of the requirement in section 1115(c)(1) of ANGCRRA described in paragraph (9), together with the reason for each waiver.

  • In FY 00, no waivers were granted by the Secretary of the Army.

(11) The number of Army National Guard members, shown for each State, and the number of US Army Reserve members shown by each RSC/GOCOM, who were screened during the preceding fiscal year to determine whether they meet minimum physical profile standards required for deployment;

  • In FY 00, approximately 72,000 ARNG underwent a retention physical. The ARNG has approximately 2,761 persons, or 0.8 percent, who are nondeployable for medical reasons.
  • In FY 00, USAR screened 35,585 soldiers. Of these, 158 failed (0.44 percent) to meet the minimum physical profile standards required for deployment.

(B) the number and percentage that were transferred pursuant to section 1116 of ANGCRRA to the personnel accounting category described in paragraph (8).

  • ARMY NATIONAL GUARD: The ARNG did not track the total number of personnel that transferred from a deployable to a nondeployable status during FY 2000.

(12) The number of members, and the percentage total membership, of the Army National Guard, shown for each State, and for the U.S. Army reserve shown by each RSC/DRU, who underwent a medical screening during the previous fiscal year as provided in section 1117 of ANGCRRA.

  • Public Law 104-106, Div A, Title VII, Section 704 (b), Feb 10, 1996, repealed Section 1117 of ANGCRRA.

(13) The number of members, and the percentage of the total membership, of the Army National Guard, shown for each State, and the number of members, and the percentage of the total membership, of the U.S. Army Reserve shown for each RSC/DRU, who underwent a dental screening during the previous fiscal year as provided in section 1117 of ANGCRRA.

  • Public Law 104-106, Div A, Title VII, Section 704 (b), Feb 10, 1996, repealed Section 1117 of ANGCRRA.

(14) The number of members, and the percentage of the total membership, of the Army National Guard, shown for each State, and the number of members, and the percentage of total Selected Reserve unit membership, of the U.S. Army Reserve, shown for each RSC/DRU, over the age of 40 who underwent a full physical examination during the previous fiscal year for purposes of section 1117 of ANGCRRA.

  • Public Law 104-106, Div A, Title VII, Section 704 (b), Feb 10, 1996, repealed Section 1117 of ANGCRRA.

(15) The number of units of the Army National Guard, and of the U.S. Army Reserve, that are scheduled for early deployment in the event of a mobilization and, of those units, the number that are dentally ready for deployment in accordance with section 1118 of ANGCRRA.

  • Public Law 104-106, Div A, Title VII, Section 704 (b), Feb 10, 1996, repealed Section 1118 of ANGCRRA.

(16) The estimated post-mobilization training time for each Army National Guard combat and FSP unit, and U.S. Army Reserve FSP unit, and a description, displayed in broad categories and by State for Army National Guard units, and by the RSC/GOCOM for U.S. Army Reserve units, of what training would need to be accomplished for Army National Guard combat and CFP units, and U.S. Army Reserve units, in a post-mobilization period for purposes of section 1119 of ANGCRRA.

  • Estimated time for post mobilization training is reported through the Unit Status Report, is classified, and is maintained by the Department of the Army, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations, Force Readiness Division.
  • Information on the type of training required by units during post mobilization is maintained by the Continental United States Armies (CONUSAs).
  • Post mobilization training for enhanced Separate Brigades (eSB) can be categorized as maneuver, attack, defend, protect the force, gunnery and NBC defense.
  • Post mobilization training for FSP units is principally common task testing, NBC defense, force protection, sustainment, command and control, weapons qualification, tactical communications training, and branch specific technical training. Virtually all units also require branch specific technical training to meet deployment standards.

(17) A description of the measures taken during the preceding fiscal year to comply with the requirement in section 1120 of ANGCRRA to expand the use of simulations, simulators, and advanced training devices and technologies for members and units of the Army National Guard and the U.S. Army Reserve.

The ARNG continues to incorporate virtual and constructing simulation into individual, crew and or team, collective, and institutional training. Devices include the Abrams Full Crew Interactive Simulation Trainer (AFIST), the Engagement Skills Trainer (EST), the Tank Weapons Gunnery Simulation System (TWGSS), the Guard Fist II (GFII) maneuver simulators for combat units. They have fielded the Fire Support Combined Arms Tactical Trainer (FSCATT) and the Digital Systems Test and Training Simulator (DSTATS) for Field Artillery units. They have also expanded collective staff training using ARTBASS, JANUS, and the USAR's Brigade Battalion Battle Simulation (BBS).

The Army Distance Learning Program is establishing Distance Learning (DL) classrooms on Active Army Posts, in Total Army School System (TASS) battalions quartered in National Guard Armories, and in Army Reserve Centers. Currently, the ARNG has 195 multimedia classrooms, 61 smaller trainer classrooms, and 54 Asynchronous Transfer Mode command and control Video Tele-Conference (VTC) sites. The Guard is fielding an average of 6-7 classrooms per month.

The U.S. Army Reserve Training Support Divisions continue to operate five Battle Projection Centers (BPCs). The BPCs provide both Army Reserve and Army National Guard units with the ability to train using Army standard simulation tools, e.g. BBS. The Army Reserve has begun fielding DL classrooms (e.g. Ft. McCoy, WI) and will continue to fund more development in the POM years.

Funding constraints limit efforts by the Active Army, ARNG, and U.S. Army Reserve to increase the use of simulations to the extent desired.

(18) Summary tables of unit readiness, shown for each State for Army National Guard units, and for each RSC/GOCOM for the U.S. Army Reserve units, and drawn from the unit readiness rating system as required by section 1121 of ANGCRRA, including the personnel readiness rating information and the equipment readiness assessment information required by that section, together with-

(A) Explanations of the information shown in the table. Summary tables are classified. This information is maintained by maintained by the Department of the Army, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations, Training Division.

(B) Based on the information shown in the tables, the Secretary's overall assessment of the deployability of units of the Army National Guard, and U.S. Army Reserve, including a discussion of personnel deficiencies and equipment shortfalls in accordance with such section 1121:

  • Summary tables and assessments are classified. This information is maintained by the Department of the Army, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations, Training Division.

(19) Summary tables, shown for each State, for units of the Army National Guard and for each RSC/DRU for units of the U.S. Army Reserve, of the results of inspections of units of the Army National Guard by inspectors general or other commissioned officers of the Regular Army under the provisions of section 105 of title 32, together with explanations of the information shown in the tables, and including display of:

(A) the number of such inspections;

(B) identification of the entity conducting each inspection;

(C) the number of units inspected; and

(D) the overall results of such inspections, including the inspector's determination for each inspected unit of whether the unit met deployability standards and, for those units not meeting deployability standards, the reasons for such failure and the status of corrective actions. For purposes of this report, data for Operational Readiness Evaluations will be provided on eSB and FSP units of the ARNG and for FSP units of the USAR. Training Assessment Model data will be provided to meet this reporting requirement for all other units of the ARNG and USAR. Data on ARNG units will be reported by State and on USAR units by RSC/DRU.

  • During Fiscal Year 00, Army National Guard state level Inspectors General conducted extensive inspections throughout the United States. State level Inspectors General conducted approximately 688 inspections during the year, visiting 864 separate units. Because IG inspections focus on findings and recommendations, the units involved in these inspections were not provided with a pass/fail rating. Results of inspections conducted by Inspectors General are available upon request from the responsible state IG. Operational Readiness Evaluation Data for FSP and eSBs is unavailable as these inspections were eliminated as requirements in 1997. Data available under the Training Assessment Model (TAM) relates to readiness levels and is generally not available in an unclassified format. TAM data is maintained at the state level and is available upon request from state level training readiness officials.
  • The United States Army Reserve Command (USARC) conducts Organizational Inspection Program (OIP) inspections for RSCs/DSUs. Eight such inspections were conducted in FY 2000 and all met deployability standards. Forces Command (FORSCOM) maintains the results of the CONUSA inspections, Training Assessment Models (TAMs), and holds the data for Reserve Component FSP unit inspections.
  • Summary tables depicting CONUSA inspection numbers by state for the ARNG and by Regional Support Command for the USAR units are available from G3, DCSOPS, FORSCOM.


(20) A listing, for each Army National Guard combat and FSP unit, and the U.S. Army Reserve FSP units, of the active-duty combat and other units associated with that Army National Guard and U.S. Army Reserve unit in accordance with section 1131(a) of ANGCRRA, shown by State for the Army National Guard and RSC/GOCOM for the U.S. Army Reserve:

  • This information is contained in FORSCOM Regulation 350-4, Appendix B and C. An electronic version can be viewed at www.forscom.army.mil/pubs/Pubs/2530/SEC1-7_3.HTM.

and to be accompanied, for each such National Guard and U.S. Army Reserve unit, by --

(A) the assessment of the commander of that associated active-duty unit of the manpower, equipment, and training resource requirements of that National Guard or U.S. Army Reserve unit in accordance with section 1131(b)(3) of ANGCRRA. Detailed assessments of specific RC units are maintained at the two numbered Army's in the continental United States (CONUSA) and three CONUS-based corps.

  • Army National Guard (ARNG) divisions and eSB.

Manpower. Several eSB have shortages in enlisted personnel and junior officers. Duty Military Occupational Specialty Qualification (DMOSQ) is a training challenge because Military Occupational Specialties (MOS) require extensive training, often at sequential schools. Within the eSB Full Time Support (FTS) continues to be a challenge. In the eSB FTS is approximately 55 percent of requirements. In divisions, recent force structure authorization increases are causing short-term fill percentages shortfalls.

Equipment. Equipment on-hand versus equipment authorized continues to hamper eSB conversion. Shortages in chemical defense equipment and night vision devices limit the full range of training for eSB.

Training. Adequate training resources in FY 00 enabled eSB to sustain platoon pre-mobilization training proficiency. Distances to crew-served weapons ranges and the availability of adequate maneuver areas continue to challenge most units. Current simulations do not provide a theater-level simulation system, compatible with current simulation suites that replicate a Major Theater of War scenario.

  • ARNG and USAR Force Support Package Units.

Manpower. Shortfalls in FTS manning limit operations and training management. Sustaining DMOSQ impacted by limited school spaces for low density MOS. Some MOS require extensive training (11M, 19K, 13B, 13F, 31, and 63H) and sequential schools require a soldiers absence from their civilian employment for extended periods.

Equipment. Some FSP units have equipment that is incompatible their active counterparts. This creates problems, especially with command and control, during training. Several FSP units will have to acquire needed force modernization equipment at the mobilization station.

Training. Some Equipment Readiness Code-A equipment shortages inhibit effective training. Units will require additional training time after mobilization to achieve proficiency on collective tasks. Limited funds and/or limited days available for training generally cause soldiers to attend either Annual Training or DMOSQ schools. Distance to training areas and facilities further erodes available training time.

(B) The results of the validation by the commander of that associated active-duty unit of the compatibility of that National Guard or U.S. Army Reserve unit with active duty forces in accordance with section 1131(b)(4) of ANGCRRA.

  • Detailed validations are maintained by the Department of the Army, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations, Training Division.
  • For ARNG divisions and eSBs, Single Channel Ground and Airborne Radio System and Mobile Subscriber Equipment connectivity is the foremost compatibility issue. As MTOE changes and unit reorganizations continue, compatibility will improve.
  • ARNG and USAR FSP unit equipment shortages resulting from reorganizations and MTOE changes affect compatibility the most. Nonstandard software systems in these units affect both the Standard Installation Division Personnel System and the Unit Level Logistics System. Corresponding systems between components are frequently very different. Most FSP units will not be fully compatible with AC units until after mobilization.

(21) A specification of the active-duty personnel assigned to units of the Selected Reserve pursuant to section 414(c) of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (10 U.S.C. 261 note), shown (A) by State for the Army National Guard and RSC/GOCOM for the U.S. Army Reserve, (b) by rank of officers, warrant officers, and enlisted members assigned, and (c) by unit or other organizational entity of assignment.

  • The Army restructuring process is complete. All mal-assigned soldiers have been reassigned or retired. Current and projected strength is 98 to 100 percent. The goal under the Army's Manning Initiative is 100 percent for combat units. The Army Personnel Command Strength Branch, Distribution Division will continue to track titled and non-titled positions.